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Introduction of Directive 2002/44/EC
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 Title & Authors
Introduction of Directive 2002/44/EC
Park, Hee-Sok;
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 Abstract
Objective: The aim of this paper is to introduce the Directive 2002/44/EC on the minimum health and safety requirements regarding the exposure of workers to the risks arising from vibration. Background: Human beings interact with machinery, and contact with vibration is commonplace. Unfortunately, continuous exposure to mechanical vibration can lead to physical injury. And standards are needed for identifying those at risk and for taking steps to mitigate the problem and reduce risk of injury. Method: The contents of the Directive were summarized and discussed, especially against its ISO counterparts. Results: The Directive deals with minimum safety and health prescriptions relative to workers` exposure to risks due to mechanical vibration. This directive specifies exposure limit values and action values. It also specifies employers` obligations with regard to determining and assessing risks, sets out the measures to be taken to reduce or avoid workers` exposure. Finally, it details how to make exposed workers aware of this issue. Conclusion: In spite of some limitations, it has recently been transcribed into all national laws of member States of European union. Application: The results of the paper might help to establish or update the domestic standards on vibration.
 Keywords
Human vibration;Standard;Directive 2002/44/EC;
 Language
Korean
 Cited by
1.
Trend of Human Vibration Research in Korea,;

Journal of the Ergonomics Society of Korea, 2013. vol.32. 4, pp.293-295 crossref(new window)
1.
Trend of Human Vibration Research in Korea, Journal of the Ergonomics Society of Korea, 2013, 32, 4, 293  crossref(new windwow)
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