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A Study on the Difference of Total Grip Strength and Individual Finger Force between Dominant and Non-dominant Hands in Various Grip Spans of Pliers
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 Title & Authors
A Study on the Difference of Total Grip Strength and Individual Finger Force between Dominant and Non-dominant Hands in Various Grip Spans of Pliers
Kong, Yong-Ku; Park, Hyunjoon; Kim, Dujeong; Lee, Taemoon; Roh, Eunyoung; Lee, Seulki; Zhao, Wenbin; Kim, Dae-Min; Kang, Hyun-Sung;
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 Abstract
Objective: The purpose of this study is to analyze the individual finger force between dominant hand and non-dominant hand and to investigate an effect of the individual finger on the total grip strength depending on dominant hand and non-dominant hand. Background: Many studies on the ratio of the grip force between dominant hand and non-dominant hand has been researched. While a 10% rule which is a ratio of the grip force between dominant hand and non-dominant hand has been applied in most studies, studies on the rate of the individual finger force between dominant hand and non-dominant hand have been insufficiently researched. Method: The experiment was preceded with 17 subjects (male, mean 25.8 ages). The individual finger force and total grip strength were measured using pliers being able to change the grip span from 45 to 80mm. Results: The difference of total grip strength between dominant hand and non-dominant hand is following 10% rule. However, the difference of individual finger force between dominant hand and non-dominant hand are not same as the difference of total grip strength. Especially in the case of grip span with 50mm, the differences between total grip strength, index finger, middle finger, ring finger, and little finger were , , , , , respectively, with p=0.018 of statistical significance. Additionally, the results of regression analysis in 50 and 60mm of grip span showed that the difference in ring finger affected the most to the total grip strength; and the effects followed in order of index finger, middle finger, and little finger. Conclusion: Our study suggests that an effect of individual finger and grip span of pliers have to be considered when explaining the difference of the total grip strength between dominant hand and non-dominant hand. Application: This result is expected to be used for designing ergonomic hand tool.
 Keywords
Total grip strength;Individual finger force;Dominant and non-dominant hands;
 Language
Korean
 Cited by
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