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Localization of the Major Retinal Neurotransmitters and Receptors and Müller Glia in the Retina of the Greater Horseshoe Bat (Rhinolophus ferrumequinum)
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 Title & Authors
Localization of the Major Retinal Neurotransmitters and Receptors and Müller Glia in the Retina of the Greater Horseshoe Bat (Rhinolophus ferrumequinum)
Lee, Jun-Seok; Kwon, Oh-Ju; Jeon, Tae-Heon; Jeon, Chang-Jin;
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 Abstract
Purpose: The objective of this study was to investigate the visual system of the greater horseshoe bat (Rhinolophus ferrumequinum) by location analysis of some major neurotransmitters glutamate, -aminobutyric acid (GABA), acetylcholine, and their receptors, and glial cells in retina. Methods: Standard immunocytochemical techniques were used after vibratome section of retinal tissues of adult greater horseshoe bat for this study. Immnoreactions in immunofluorescence images were analyzed using confocal microscope. Results: Anti-glutamate-immunoreactive neurons were mainly localized in the ganglion cell layer (GCL). The majority of anti-GABA-immunoreactive cells distributed in the inner nuclear layer (INL), and GABAA receptors were localized in the inner plexiform layer (IPL). Anti-choline acetyltransferase-immuoreactive cholinergic neurons were mainly located in the INL and GCL, and most of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors were localized in the IPL. The cells in the retina of the greater horseshoe bat stretched theirs range from the GCL to outer nuclear layer (ONL). Conclusions: This study revealed that the retinas of the greater horseshoe bats contain the same major neurotransmitters and receptors, and glial cell in visually functional mammalian retinas. The present results may suggest that the greater horseshoe bats have the functional retinas for visual analysis through the organized retinal neural circuits.
 Keywords
Acetylcholine;-aminobutyric acid;Glutamate;Immunocytochemistry; cell;Retina;The greater horseshoe bat;
 Language
Korean
 Cited by
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