JOURNAL BROWSE
Search
Advanced SearchSearch Tips
Comparison of Biomechanical Characteristics of Rowing Performance between Elite and Non-Elite Scull Rowers: A Pilot Study
facebook(new window)  Pirnt(new window) E-mail(new window) Excel Download
 Title & Authors
Comparison of Biomechanical Characteristics of Rowing Performance between Elite and Non-Elite Scull Rowers: A Pilot Study
Kim, Jin-Sun; Cho, Hanyeop; Han, Bo-Ram; Yoon, So-Ya; Park, Seonhyung; Cho, Hyunseung; Lee, Joohyeon; Lee, Hae-Dong;
  PDF(new window)
 Abstract
Objective: This study aimed to examine the characteristics of joint kinematics and synchronicity of rowing motion between elite and non-elite rowers. Methods: Two elite and two non-elite rowers performed rowing strokes (3 trials, 20 strokes in each trial) at three different stroke rates (20, 30, 40 stroke/min) on two stationary rowing ergometers. The rowing motions of the rowers were captured using a 3-dimensional motion analysis system (8-infrared camera VICON system, Oxford, UK). The range of motion (RoM) of the knee, hip, and elbow joints on the sagittal plane, the lead time () and the drive time ) for each joint, and the elapsed time for the knee joint to maintain a fully extended position () during the stroke were analyzed and compared between elite and non-elite rowers. Synchronicity of the rowing motion within and between groups was examined using coefficients of variation (CV) of the for each joint. Results: Regardless of the stroke rate, the RoM of all joints were greater for the elite than for non-elite rowers, except for the RoMs of the knee joint at 30 stroke/min and the elbow joint at 40 stroke/min (p < .05). Although the at all stroke rates were the same between the groups, the for each joint was shorter for the elite than for the non-elite rowers. During the drive phase, elite rowers kept the fully extended knee joint angle longer than the non-elite rowers (p < .05). The CV values of the TDrive within each group were smaller for the elite compared with non-elite rowers, except for the CV values of the hip at all stroke/min and elbow at 40 stroke/min. Conclusion: The elite, compared with non-elite, rowers seem to be able to perform more powerful and efficient rowing strokes with large RoM and a short with the same .
 Keywords
Human;Rowing;Kinematics;Synchronicity;Rowing ergometer;
 Language
English
 Cited by
1.
Relationship between Aiming Patterns and Scores in Archery Shooting, Korean Journal of Sport Biomechanics, 2016, 26, 4, 353  crossref(new windwow)
 References
1.
Asami, T., Adachi, N. & Yamamoto, K. (1981). Biomechanical analysis of rowing performances. Biomechanics VII-B, 442-446.

2.
Barrett, R. & Manning, J. (2004). Rowing: Relationships between rigging set-up, Anthropometry, physical capacity, Rowing kinematics and Rowing performance. Sports Biomechanics, 3(2), 221-235. crossref(new window)

3.
Baudouin, A. & Hawkins, D. (2002). A biomechanical review of factors affecting rowing performance. British Journal of Sports Medicine, 36(6), 396-402. crossref(new window)

4.
Buckeridge, E., Bull, A. & McGregor, A. (2015). Biomechanical determinants of elite rowing technique and performance. Scandinavian Journal of Medicine & Science in Sports, 25(2), e176-e183. crossref(new window)

5.
Chiu, L. Z. & Salem, G. J. (2006). Comparison of joint kinetics during free weight and flywheel resistance exercise. The Journal of Strength & Conditioning Research, 20(3), 555-562.

6.
Flanagan, S., Salem, G. J., Wang, M.-Y., Sanker, S. E. & Greendale, G. A. (2003). Squatting exercises in older adults: kinematic and kinetic comparisons. Medicine and science in sports and exercise, 35(4), 635. crossref(new window)

7.
Holt, P., Bull, A., Cashman, P. & McGregor, A. (2003). Kinematics of spinal motion during prolonged rowing. International journal of sports medicine, 24(8), 597-602. crossref(new window)

8.
Kim, Y. U. & Kim, Y. J. (2009). Biomechanical Comparison of Good and Bad Performances within Individual in Maximum Vertical Jump. Korean Journal of Sports Biomechanics, 19(3), 489-497. crossref(new window)

9.
Kim, Y. U. & Eun, S. D. (2009). The Effects of Restricted Trunk Motion on the Performance of Maximum Vertical Jump. Korean Journal of Sports Biomechanics, 19(1), 27-36. crossref(new window)

10.
Lamb, D. H. (1989). A kinematic comparison of ergometer and on-water rowing. The American journal of sports medicine, 17(3), 367-373. crossref(new window)

11.
Lee, H. D., Han, B. R., Kim, J. S., Oh, J. H., Cho, H. Y. & Yoon, S. Y. (2015). Differences in the length change pattern of the medial gastrocnemius muscle-tendon complex and fascicle during gait and one-legged and twolegged vertical jumping. Korean Journal of Sports Biomechanics, 25(2), 175-182. crossref(new window)

12.
MacFarlane, D., Edmond, I. & Walmsley, A. (1997). Instrumentation of an ergometer to monitor the reliability of rowing performance. Journal of Sports Sciences, 15(2), 167-173. crossref(new window)

13.
Martin, T. P. & Bernfield, J. S. (1979). Effect of stroke rate on velocity of a rowing shell. Medicine and science in sports and exercise, 12(4), 250-256.

14.
Nelson, W. N. & Widule, C. J. (1982). Kinematic analysis and efficiency estimate of intercollegiate female rowers. Medicine and science in sports and exercise, 15(6), 535-541.

15.
Roy, S. H., De Luca, C. J., Snyder-Mackler, L., Emley, M. S., Crenshaw, R. L. & Lyons, J. P. (1990). Fatigue, recovery, and low back pain in varsity rowers. Medicine and science in sports and exercise, 22(4), 463-469.

16.
Schneider, E. & Hauser, M. (1981). Biomechanical analysis of performance in rowing. Biomechanics VII-B, 430-435.

17.
Smith, R. M. & Loschner, C. (2002). Biomechanics feedback for rowing. Journal of Sports Sciences, 20(10), 783-791. crossref(new window)

18.
Smith, R. M. & Spinks, W. L. (1995). Discriminant analysis of biomechanical differences between novice, good and elite rowers. Journal of Sports Sciences, 13(5), 377-385. crossref(new window)