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Palliative Care Education in Gynecologic Oncology: a Survey of Gynecologic Oncologists and Gynecologic Oncology Fellows in Thailand
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 Title & Authors
Palliative Care Education in Gynecologic Oncology: a Survey of Gynecologic Oncologists and Gynecologic Oncology Fellows in Thailand
Ratanakaaew, A; Khemapech, N; Laurujisawat, P;
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 Abstract
Background: The main purpose of this study was to survey the education and training of certified gynecologic oncologists and fellows in Thailand. A secondary objective was to study the problems in fellowship training regarding palliative care for gynecologic cancer patients. Materials and Methods: A descriptive study was conducted by sending a questionnaire regarding palliative care education to all certified gynecologic oncologists and gynecologic oncology fellows in Thailand. The contents of the survey included fellowship training experience, caring for the dying, patient preparation, attitudes and respondent characteristics. Statistics were analyzed by percentage, mean and standard deviation and chi-square. Results: One hundred seventy completed questionnaires were returned; the response rate was 66%. Most certified gynecologic oncologists and fellows in gynecologic oncology have a positive attitude towards palliative care education, and agree that "psychological distress can result in severe physical suffering". It was found that the curriculum of gynecologic oncology fellowship training equally emphasizes three aspects, namely managing post-operative complications, managing a patient at the end of life and managing a patient with gynecologic oncology. As for experiential training during the fellowship of gynecologic oncology, education regarding breaking bad news, discussion about goals of care and procedures for symptoms control were mostly on-the-job training without explicit teaching. In addition, only 42.9 % of respondents were explicitly taught the coping skill for managing their own stress when caring for palliative patients during fellowship training. Most of respondents rated their clinical competency for palliative care in the "moderately well prepared" level, and the lowest score of the competency was the issue of spiritual care. Conclusions: Almost all certified gynecologic oncologists and fellows in gynecologic oncology have a positive attitude towards learning and teaching in palliative care. In this study, some issues were identified for improving palliative care education such as proper training under the supervision of a mentor, teaching how to deal with work stress, competency in spiritual care and attitudes on responsibility for bereavement care.
 Keywords
Palliative care education;gynecologic oncology;Thailand;
 Language
English
 Cited by
1.
A Call for New Communication Channels for Gynecological Oncology Trainees, International Journal of Gynecological Cancer, 2017, 27, 3, 620  crossref(new windwow)
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