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Quitline Activity in Rajasthan, India
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 Title & Authors
Quitline Activity in Rajasthan, India
Gupta, Rakesh; Verma, Vinit; Mathur, Pankaj;
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 Abstract
Quitline activity in Rajasthan, India is a voluntary activity of Rajasthan Cancer Foundation (RCF) since April 2013. To kick-off, it took the benefit of the State Government- PIRAMAL SWASTHYA (PS)1 collaborative 104 Health Information Helpline that existed already in public-private partnership. It is a reactive quitline that helps callers through the counselors and nursing staff trained specifically through the weekly sessions held by the first author, the RCF resource on quitline. Besides structuring of the scripts for primary intervention and follow-ups after 1 week, 1 month, 6 months and a year, he also monitors calls, advices and coordinates with the supervisors to manage and analyze the data base, and reports to the PS lead at the Jaipur Center on overall performance and to plan strategic communication with the State Government on its outcomes. The quitline has limitations of its informal existence through a voluntary effort of RCF, no specific resource allocation, suboptimal data management, minimal awareness in the masses due to poor IEC (Information, Education and Communication; except its efforts made by RCF in last 1 year through the government-run State TV and City Radio) and staff shortage and its attrition due to lack of plan for career advancement. Despite these challenges in the year 2013, the quit line has registered a quit rate (for complete abstinence) of 19.93% amongst 1525 callers. The quit rate were 58.01% (304/ 524) among the responders at the 3rd follow-up at 18 months (in September 2014)2. In view of an increase in quit rate by 5- 9 times over the prevailing quit rate in the former ever daily users [both smokers and the users of smokeless tobacco (SLT)], efforts are being made by RCF in concurrence with PS to have this cost-effective model established formally with optimal resource allocation in collaboration with willing agencies (the State and Central Governments and the International Quitline Agencies) and its replication in 4 more states where PS is collaborating with the respective state governments similarly (Assam, Chhattisgarh, Jharkhand and Karnataka).
 Keywords
Quitline;Rajasthan Cancer Foundation;Piramal Swasthya;Rajasthan;India;Quit rate;
 Language
English
 Cited by
1.
Effects of DCK knockdown on proliferation, apoptosis and tumorigenicity in vivo of cervical cancer HeLa cells, Cancer Gene Therapy, 2017, 24, 9, 367  crossref(new windwow)
2.
Methylation analysis of p16, SLIT2, SCARA5, and Runx3 genes in hepatocellular carcinoma, Medicine, 2017, 96, 41, e8279  crossref(new windwow)
 References
1.
Piramal Swasthya. Available at http://www.piramalswasthya.com/ and http://www.piramalswasthya.com/what-we-do/health-information-helpline/. Accessed on 12 May 2015.

2.
Piramal Swasthya, Jaipur Unit at Swasthya Bhawan (Directorate of Medical & Health, Government of Rajasthan, Jaipur). Personal Communication. June 2015.

3.
The Cigarettes and Other Tobacco Products Prohibition Act 2003. Available at http://www.who.int/fctc/reporting/Annexthreeindia.pdf. Accessed on 12 May 2015.

4.
International Institute for Population Sciences (IIPS), Mumbai and Ministry of Health and Family Welfare. Global Adult Tobacco Survey (GATS INDIA), 2009-2010. Available at http://mohfw.nic.in/WriteReadData/l892s/1455618937GATS%20India.pdf. Accessed on 12 May 2015.

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Facebook. Rajasthan Cancer Foundation. 2015. Available at https://www.facebook.com/rajasthancancerfoundation?ref=hl. Accessed on 12 April 2015.

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YouTube. Dr. Rakesh Gupta Society and Tobacco. 2015. Available at https://www.google.co.in/#safe=active&q=Youtube+dr.+rakesh+gupta+society+and+tobacco. accessed on 23 May 2015.