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Reduction Gear Stability Estimation due to Torque Variation on the Marine Propulsion System with High-speed Four Stroke Diesel Engine
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 Title & Authors
Reduction Gear Stability Estimation due to Torque Variation on the Marine Propulsion System with High-speed Four Stroke Diesel Engine
Kim, InSeob; Yoon, Hyunwoo; Kim, Junseong; Vuong, QuangDao; Lee, Donchool;
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 Abstract
Maritime safety has been more critical recently due to the occurrence of shipboard accidents involving prime movers. As such, the propulsion shafting design and construction plays a vital role in the safe operation of the vessel other than focusing on being cost-efficient. Smaller vessels propulsion shafting system normally install high speed four-stroke diesel engine with reduction gear for propulsion efficiency. Due to higher cylinder combustion pressures, flexible couplings are employed to reduce the increased vibratory torque. In this paper, an actual vibration measurement and theoretical analysis was carried out on a propulsion shafting with V18.3L engine installed on small car-ferry and revealed higher torsional vibration. Hence, a rubber-block type flexible coupling was installed to attenuate the transmitted vibratory torque. Considering the flexible coupling application factor, reduction gear stability due to torque variation was analyzed in accordance with IACS(International Association of Classification Societies) M56 and the results are presented herein.
 Keywords
Marine Reduction Gear;Torque Variation;Torsional Vibration;High Seed Four Stroke Diesel Engine;
 Language
Korean
 Cited by
 References
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