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Effects of Security Lighting Lamps on Discomfort Glare to Indoor Occupants
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  • Journal title : KIEAE Journal
  • Volume 15, Issue 4,  2015, pp.21-28
  • Publisher : Korea Institute of Ecological Architecture and Environment
  • DOI : 10.12813/kieae.2015.15.4.021
 Title & Authors
Effects of Security Lighting Lamps on Discomfort Glare to Indoor Occupants
Lee, Yoon Jeong; Kim, Jeong Tai;
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 Abstract
Purpose: Although security lights are used to secure pedestrian visibility and safety at nighttime, they can generate light trespass in the neighboring residential space. To prevent this, standards for acceptance limits on vertical illuminance and light pollution by the windows of residential buildings are presented. Method: This study thus representatively selected three types of lamps and, through an evaluation and analysis of the physical and subjective discomfort glare per lamp, proposed a discomfort glare index for each lamp. The evaluation and analysis according to the lamps were conducted through experiments. The variables were the security lights` lamps (NH 100W, MH 70W, LED 50W), installation angles (, ), and installation distances (3m, 5m, 7m, 9m). Result: According to the results of the discomfort glare evaluation depending on the angles and distances of the security lights, the following minimum standards are proposed: for NH 100W, a discomfort glare index of 30 and an installation distance of 4m; for MH 70W, a discomfort glare index of 32 and an installation distance of 4m; and, for LED 50W, a discomfort glare index of 31 and an installation distance of 6m, respectively. In addition, this paper recommends the use of MH 70W, when the road width is 4m-6m, and LED 50W, when the road width is over 6m, respectively.
 Keywords
Discomfort glare;Security lighting;Lamps;
 Language
English
 Cited by
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