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Net Ecosystem Productivity Determined by Continuous Measurement Using Automatic Sliding Canopy Chamber
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 Title & Authors
Net Ecosystem Productivity Determined by Continuous Measurement Using Automatic Sliding Canopy Chamber
Kim, Gun-Yeob; Lee, Seul-Bi; Lee, Jong-Sik; Choi, Eun-Jung;
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 Abstract
For better understanding of carbon cycle dynamics of an agro-ecosystem, an accurate assessment of seasonal and daily flux is essential to understand the relationship between various environmental factors and crop productivity. We developed the automatic sliding canopy chamber (ASCC) system that measured continuous net ecosystem productivity (NEP) over whole growing season under the natural meteorological rhythm. The ASCC was composed of two main parts which were sliding part for measuring NEP, and automatic opening and closing chamber (AOCC) for measuring soil respiration (SR) on the soil surface. The ASCC was developed by using open flow method for measuring soil efflux. The disturbance of natural meteorological condition was minimized by opening the base frames. In the field test with barley (Hordeum vulgare L.), NEP was calculated at on a clear day using continuous data and eliminated the possibility of overestimate about 16% using one hour data during the day time. Unlike other small scale chamber system, installation on cropping-field made it possible to take any modifications which might be caused by natural environmental condition.
 Keywords
Automatic sliding canopy chamber;Automatic opening and closing chamber;Net ecosystem productivity;Carbon dioxide;
 Language
English
 Cited by
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