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Effects of Fertilizer on Growth, Carbon and Nitrogen Responses of Foliage in a Red Pine Stand
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 Title & Authors
Effects of Fertilizer on Growth, Carbon and Nitrogen Responses of Foliage in a Red Pine Stand
Kim, Choonsig; Ju, Nam-Gyu; Lee, Hye-Yeon; Lee, Kwang-Soo;
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 Abstract
This study was to examine growth, carbon and nitrogen responses in foliage following forest fertilization in a red pine stand. Two types of fertilizer (N:P:K=113:150:37 kg ; P:K=150:37 kg ) were applied on late April 2011. Growth, carbon and nitrogen responses of foliage were monitored 3 times (July, September, November) after fertilization. Morphological growth responses (dry mass, leaf area, specific leaf area) with foliage age were not significantly (P > 0.05) affected by fertilizer application, while needle dry mass and leaf area of July were significantly lower in current-year-old than in one-year-old or two-year-old needles of September or November. Carbon concentration and content in foliage was little affected by fertilizer application compared with sampling month or needle age, while the NPK fertilizer produced high nitrogen concentration and content of foliage. The results indicate that nitrogen concentration and content in foliage may serve as an indicator of the nitrogen status by fertilization in a red pine stand.
 Keywords
Carbon;Fertilization;Foliage analysis;Nitrogen;Red pine;
 Language
English
 Cited by
1.
Growth and Nutrient Status of Foliage as Affected by Tree Species and Fertilization in a Fire-Disturbed Urban Forest, Forests, 2015, 6, 6, 2199  crossref(new windwow)
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