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Persistence of Salmonella enterica, Escherichia coli O157:H7, and Listeria monocytogenes in Soil, Liquid Manure Amended Soil, and Liquid Manure
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 Title & Authors
Persistence of Salmonella enterica, Escherichia coli O157:H7, and Listeria monocytogenes in Soil, Liquid Manure Amended Soil, and Liquid Manure
Jung, Kyu-Seok; Kim, Min-Ha; Heu, Sung-Gi; Roh, Eun-Jung; Lee, Dong-Hwan; Lim, Jeong-A; Ryu, Jae-Gee; Kim, Kye-Hoon;
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 Abstract
While searching for healthier diets, people became more attentive to agricultural organic products. However, organic foods may be more susceptible to microbiological contamination because of the use of livestock manure compost and liquid manure, potential sources of pathogenic bacteria. This study was undertaken to investigate the persistence of Salmonella enterica, Escherichia coli O157:H7, and Listeria monocytogenes in soil, liquid manure amended soil, and liquid manure. Loamy soil, liquid manure amended soil, and liquid manure were inoculated with S. enterica, E. coli O157:H7, and L. monocytogenes. Samples were incubated in consistent moisture content at . Samples had been periodically collected during 120 days depending on the given conditions. S. enterica and E. coli O157:H7 survived over 120 days in loamy soil and over 60 days in liquid manure amended soil, respectively. L. monocytogenes decreased faster than other pathogens in soil. S. enterica, E. coli O157:H7, and L. monocytogenes survived for up to 5 days in liquid manure. S. enterica and E. coli O157:H7 in soil decreased by 2 to for 120 days. S. enterica and E. coli O157:H7 in liquid manure amended soil decreased slowly for 21 days. However, S. enterica, E. coli O157:H7, and L. monocytogenes sharply decreased after 21 days. S. enterica, E. coli O157:H7, and L. monocytogenes in soil increased by 0.5 to for 7 days. Foodborne pathogens in soil and liquid manure amended soil gradually decreased over time.
 Keywords
Soil;Liquid manure;Foodborne pathogens;
 Language
Korean
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