Studies on the electrophoretic analysis of serum proteins in dogs infected with Babesia gibsoni

Babesia gibsoni에 감염(感染)된 개의 혈청단백분획(血淸蛋白分劃)에 관한 연구

  • Ihn, Dong-cheol (College of Veterinary Medicine, Chonbuk National University) ;
  • Lee, Joo-muk (College of Veterinary Medicine, Chonbuk National University) ;
  • Chae, Joon-seok (College of Veterinary Medicine, Chonbuk National University) ;
  • Cha, Hyeon-sung (College of Veterinary Medicine, Chonbuk National University)
  • 인동철 (전북대학교 수의과대학) ;
  • 이주묵 (전북대학교 수의과대학) ;
  • 채준석 (전북대학교 수의과대학) ;
  • 차현성 (전북대학교 수의과대학)
  • Received : 1990.12.04
  • Published : 1991.01.31

Abstract

To observe the changes of serum proteins according to the process of Babesia gibsoni(B gibsoni) infection, the babesia protozoa($10^8/kg$) were inoculated into the cephalic vein of healthy dogs. The serum proteins of experimentally infected dogs were separated by using cellulose acetate electrophoresis. The results obtained were as follows; 1. Cellulose acetate electrophoresis was fractionated to total 6 of bands such as, albumin, ${\alpha}_1$, ${\alpha}_2$, ${\beta}_1$, ${\beta}_2$ and $\gamma$-globulin. 2. The concentration of total protein was shown a decreasing tendency after B gibsoni infection. Albumin and A/G ratio were lowered through all periods of the infection, but they were not significant changes. 3. The level of ${\alpha}_1$-globulin was significantly(p<0.05) incresed in early stage of the infection. 4. The levels of ${\alpha}_2$ and total $\alpha$-globulin were shown highly significant decreases (p<0.01) through all periods of the infection. 5. The levels of ${\beta}_1$ and total $\beta$-globulin had highly significant changes (p<0.01) that was increased in early stage of infection and decreased later. 6. The level of $\gamma$-globulin was seen to be constantly increased through all periods of infection. It was a highly significant change (p<0.01). 7. Plasma protein: fibrinogen (PP:F) ratio was shown a temporally significant increase (p<0.05) following the decrease in early infection.