A CHARACTERIZATION OF PROJECTIVE GEOMETRIES

  • Published : 1995.08.01

Abstract

The most fundamental examples of (combinatorial) geometries are projective geometries PG(n - 1,q) of dimension n - 1, representable over GF(q), where q is a prime power. Every upper interval of a projective geometry is a projective geometry. The Whitney numbers of the second kind are Gaussian coefficients. Every flat of a projective geometry is modular, so the projective geometry is supersolvable in the sense of Stanley [6].