Pycnidiospore Production and Dispersal from the Warts Produced by Infection of Botryosphaeria dothidea on Apple Stems

  • Park, Chang-Hee (Department of Agricultural Biology, College of Agriculture, Kyungpook National University) ;
  • Yang, Hee-Jung (Department of Agricultural Biology, College of Agriculture, Kyungpook National University) ;
  • Hyun Woo (Department of Agricultural Biology, College of Agriculture, Kyungpook National University) ;
  • Kim, Dai-Gee (Department of Agricultural Biology, College of Agriculture, Kyungpook National University) ;
  • Uhm, Jae-Youl (jyuhm@bh.kyungpook.ac.kr)
  • Published : 1999.12.01

Abstract

Applying the method of quantitative analysis of pycnidiospore from the detached warts produced by the infection of Botryosphaeria dothidea on apple stems, repeated productivity of spores within the detached warts, variations in the amount of spores within the detached warts, variations in the amount of spores by the length of induction time for sporulation, and the effects of temperature and moisture on the sporulation were investigated. In addition to these experiment, the changes in the state of spores within the pycnidia contained in the warts accompanied by the induction of sporulation and dispersal of spores were also investigated. When detached warts were kept in moist conditions, the sporulation and discharge of spores were also investigated. When detached warts were kept in moist conditions, the sporulation and discharge of spores could be repeated several times, and the amount of spores were almost constant after each repeat of sporulation induction and dispersal of spores in a given period. The fact that the pycnidia filled with spores were observed at considerable rates within the warts which were subjected to the shaking in the water to release spores indicated that the spores might never be released until the pycnidia were fully matured. From the high rate of empty pycnidia even in the warts which were kept in moist conditions for induction of sporulation, the pycnidiospores might be produced through the development of new pycnidia. A considerable amount of pycnidiospores were produced at $5^{\circ}$, and the sporulation was accelerated with the rise of temperature until $35^{\circ}$. When the warts were supplied with sufficient moisture, sporulation was further accelerated. The results obtained in these experiment will be applied in developing the method for assessing the inhibitory efficacies of fungicides on the sporulation of this fungus, with which a new control measure would be developed.