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Effects of Expander Operating Conditions on Nutrient Digestibility in Finishing Pigs

  • S.L., Traylor (Department of Grain Science & Industry, Kansas State University) ;
  • K.C., Behnke (Department of Grain Science & Industry, Kansas State University) ;
  • J.D., Hancock (Dept. Anim. Sci. & Industry, Kansas State Univ.) ;
  • R.H., Hines (Dept. Anim. Sci. & Industry, Kansas State Univ.) ;
  • S.L., Johnston (Dept. Anim. Sci. & Industry, Kansas State Univ.) ;
  • B.J., Chae (Department of Animal Science & Technology, Seoul National University) ;
  • In K., Han (Department of Animal Science & Technology, Seoul National University)
  • Received : 1998.12.07
  • Accepted : 1999.01.23
  • Published : 1999.05.01

Abstract

Five experiments were conducted using finishing pigs (PIC L326 sires $\times$ C15 dams) to examine the effects of expander operating conditions on nutrient digestibility in finishing pigs. The effects of different expanding conditions (0, 11.7, 24.4, $32.5kg/cm^2$) for corn-SBM based diets (Exp. 1), wheat meddlings diet (Exp. 2), sorghum-SBM based diets (Exp. 3) and wheat-SBM based diet (Exp. 4). Exp. 5 was conducted as a $2{\times}4$ factorial arrangement and factors examined were 2 soy products (raw soybean and SBM) and 4 expanding conditions (0, 14.1, 28.1, $42.2kg/cm^2$). In experiment 1, total production rates (p>0.10) were similar among treatments. The amount of fines decreased (cubic effect, p<0.001) as cone pressure was increased from 0 to $11.7kg/cm^2$, with smaller differences as cone pressure was further increased to $35.2kg/cm^2$. Nutrient digestibilities increased (p<0.02) as the feed was subjected to higher cone pressures. Digestibilities of DM, N, and GE were maximized at $24.4kg/cm^2$ cone pressure. The DE of the diet expanded at 24.4 and $35.2kg/cm^2$ increased by 172 and 109 kcal/kg, respectively, compared to the diet processed at $0kg/cm^2$ cone pressure. In experiment 2, total production and screened pellets production rates were similar among the processing treatments (p>0.21). The amount of fines decreased (quadratic effect, p<0.03) by 9 kg/h as cone pressure was increased from 0 to $11.7kg/cm^2$. Digestibilities of DM (p<0.02), N (p<0.001), and GE (p<0.002) were increased as cone pressure was increased from 0 to $35.2kg/cm^2$. DM, N, and GE digestibility in the pigs fed the midds-based diet increased by 8, 13, and 10%, respectively, at the highest processing cone pressure compared to the diets without any cone pressure. In experiment 3, the conditioned mash moistures for the treatments were numerically similar around 15% moisture. As the expander cone pressure was increased from 0 to $11.7kg/cm^2$, energy consumption for the pellet mill decreased (quadratic effect, p<0.004) from 14.1 to 12.0 kWh/t. Dry matter and gross energy digestibility increased (cubic effects, p<0.006) as cone pressure was increased from 0 to $35.2kg/cm^2$ with the largest improvement occurring as cone pressure was increased from 0 to $11.7kg/cm^2$. Nitrogen digestibility increased (cubic effect, p<0.001) from 78.3 to 81.0% as the feed was subjected to the higher cone pressures, with N digestibility being maximized at $24.4kg/cm^2$ cone pressure. The DE of the diet increased (cubic effect, p<0.001) by 225 kcal/kg as cone pressure was increased from 0 to $11.7kg/cm^2$. In experiment 4, pellet moisture decreased and moisture loss increased as cone pressure was increased from 0 to $35.2kg/cm^2$. Also, starch gelatinization of the wheat-based diets increased from 16.8 to 49.1% as the diets were processed at 0 and $35.2kg/cm^2$ cone pressure. Nutrient digestibilities were not affected (p>0.18) by any increase in cone pressure. In experiment 5, pellet moisture decreased as cone pressure was increased 0 to $35.2kg/cm^2$. The amount of moisture loss for the diets expanded at $42.2kg/cm^2$ was 3.0 and 3.8% for the SBM and raw soybean (RB) diets, respectively. Starch gelatinization for the SBM diets were 19% greater than the RB diets. The RB diets had lower DM, N and GE digestibilities as compared to the SBM diets. The DE of the RB diets were lower (p<0.02) than the SBM diets. DM (p<0.06), N (p<0.02), and GE (p<0.001) digestibilities of the dietary treatments increased as cone pressure was increased 0 to $42.2kg/cm^2$.

Keywords

Expander;Processing Characteristics;Nutrient Digestibility;Finishing Pig

Acknowledgement

Supported by : Korea Science and Engineering Foundation(KOSEF)

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