Isolation of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus from a Shih-Tzu dog with canine distemper virus infection

  • Pak, Son-il (Veterinary Internal Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, Seoul National University) ;
  • Hwang, Cheol-yong (Veterinary Internal Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, Seoul National University) ;
  • Youn, Hwa-young (Veterinary Internal Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, Seoul National University) ;
  • Han, Hong-ryul (Veterinary Internal Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, Seoul National University)
  • Received : 1998.12.27
  • Published : 1999.04.01

Abstract

A methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) isolate was recovered from a 9-month-old female Shih-Tzu dog with canine distemper virus infection. We performed in vitro antimicrobial susceptibility test to determine the most effective antimicrobial drug against the isolate and thus, to emphasize its potential clinical importance in animal practices. Isolate was confirmed MRSA by oxacillin agar screening test. The isolate was fully resistant to all $\beta$-lactam antibiotics and was susceptible to glycopeptides. Of the other antibiotics, mupirocin, TMP/SMZ (trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole), and chloramphenicol showed inhibitory effect at the concentration of 4x MIC. The MICs ranged 0.25->$128{\mu}g/ml$, and MBCs ranged 0.5->$128{\mu}g/ml$. The combined TMP/SMZ with cefamandole or novobiocin showed synergistic effect, whereas the combination of novobiocin plus cefamandole or teicoplanin resulted in antagonistic effects. Although MRSA in animals so far has been reported in the geographically limited countries, at least theoretically, it could be occurred in the future more frequently through either human or animal origin. The use of this combination may be of value in this situation. As with all antimicrobial agents, inappropriate or unnecessarily prolonged therapy may contribute to the emergence of resistance strains and loss of efficacy.