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Diurnal Changes in the Distribution of Ruminal Bacteria Attached to Feed Particles in Sheep Fed Hay Once Daily

  • Pan, J. (Division of Bioresources and Bioproduction, Graduate School of Agriculture, Hokkaido University) ;
  • Suzuki, T. (Division of Bioresources and Bioproduction, Graduate School of Agriculture, Hokkaido University) ;
  • Ueda, K. (Division of Bioresources and Bioproduction, Graduate School of Agriculture, Hokkaido University) ;
  • Tanaka, K. (Division of Bioresources and Bioproduction, Graduate School of Agriculture, Hokkaido University) ;
  • Okubo, M. (Division of Bioresources and Bioproduction, Graduate School of Agriculture, Hokkaido University)
  • Received : 2000.06.01
  • Accepted : 2000.08.01
  • Published : 2000.12.01

Abstract

A study was made of diurnal changes in the ruminal bacteria associated with feed particles, i.e., non-associated (NAB), loosely associated (LAB), and tightly associated with particles (TAB), and the TAB concentration in different particle sizes from sheep fed orchardgrass (OG) or alfalfa (ALF) hay. Diaminopimelic acid (DAPA) was used to determine the TAB mass. Results showed that the bacterial masses in NAB and LAB were small, but comprised over 90% in TAB. The TAB mass in the ALF group sharply increased within 2 h after feeding and decreased afterward. The TAB mass showed the same trend in the OG group, increasing from 0 h to 2 h, but remained at the same level up to 14 h after feeding. The peak bacterial mass was, however, lower in the OG than the ALF group. The TAB concentration reflected the changes in total particulate tightly associated bacterial masses in both groups of hay fed sheep. Number of bacterial colonies per particle increased as the particulate size decreased in both groups. This difference, however, tended to decline as the postprandial period was prolonged. DAPA, however, tended to overestimate the TAB mass in the reticulo-rumen digesta of the hay fed sheep.

Keywords

Diurnal Change;Particle Associated Ruminal Bacteria;Sheep

Cited by

  1. Biofilm compartmentalisation of the rumen microbiome: modification of fermentation and degradation of dietary toxins vol.57, pp.11, 2017, https://doi.org/10.1071/AN17382