Alteration of Lipid Metabolism by Ginseng Supplements With Different Levels of Vitamin E in High Cholesterol-Fed Rats

  • Do, Kyung-Min (Department of Food Science and Nutrition, Kyungpook National University) ;
  • Park, Yong-Bok (Department of Genetic Engineering, Kyungpook National University) ;
  • Bok, Song-Hae (Department of Food Science and Nutrition, Kyungpook National University) ;
  • Lee, Mi-Kyung (Korea Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology, KIST) ;
  • Jeong, Tae-Sook (Department of Food Science and Nutrition, Kyungpook National University) ;
  • Choi, Myung-Sook (Department of Genetic Engineering, Kyungpook National University)
  • Published : 2001.03.01

Abstract

Ginseng may have antioxidant and pharmacologic effects similar to those of vitamin E. The interactive effect of ginseng and vitamin E was studied with respect to cholesterol metabolism and the antioxidant status. A ginseng supplement (0.1%, wt/wt) with comparable levels of vitamin E was provided with a high-cholesterol (1%, wt/wt) diet to rats for 5 weeks. The amount of vitamin E included in the ginseng-free and ginseng diets was either a low (low-E) or a normal (normal-E) level. The ginseng supplements significantly (p<0.05) altered the concentrations of plasma triglycerides in both the low-vitamin E group and normal-vitamin E group compared to the each ginseng-free group. The hepatic triglyceride and cholesterol content were not significantly (p>0.05) different between groups regardless of the vitamin E level in the diet. The hepatic HMG-CoA reductase activity was significantly (p<0.05) lowered by the ginseng supplement in both the low-vitamin E and the normal-vitamin E groups compared to the ginseng-free group. The HMG-CoA reductase activity was also significantly (p<0.05) lowered with in increase of the dietary vitamin E in the ginseng-free group. The excretion of fecal neutral sterol was significantly (p<0.05) lower in the normal-E ginseng group than th low-E ginseng-free group. Neither dietary ginseng nor vitamin E significantly changed the hepatic antioxidant enzymes activity. This data indicates that ginseng supplements lower the concentration of plasma triglyceride and hepatic HMG-CoA reductase activity regardless of eh dietary vitamin E level. This information may contribute to understanding the interactive effect of ginseng and vitamin E on cholesterol biosynthesis in high cholesterol-fed rats.