The Relationship between Risk Factors for Cardiovascular Disease and Levels of Plasma Total Homocysteine, Folate and Vitamin {TEX}$B_{12}${/TEX} in Koreans

  • Lim, Hyeon-Sook (Department of Food and Nutrition, Chonnam National Univeristy) ;
  • Heo, Young-Ran (Department of Food and Nutrition, Chonnam National Univeristy)
  • Published : 2001.03.01

Abstract

The elevation of total plasmahomocysteine is now an established risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Plasma folate and vitamin {TEX}$B_{12}${/TEX} influence Hcy metabolism as cofactors. In this study, we studied the relationship of major risk factors for cardovascular disease, including advanced age, male gender, obesity, hypertension, hyperglycemia, and dislipidemia and plasma homocyteine, folate and vitamin {TEX}$B_{12}${/TEX} levels in Koreans. A total of 195 adult Koreans participated. The subjects were divided into three groups according to how many major conventional risk factors of cardiovascular disease they had: no risk, low risk (1~3 risk factors) and high risk (>3 risk factors) groups. As the number of risk factors increased, the plasma homocysteine levels significantly increase, while the plasma folate levels significantly decreased. The plasma homocysteine levels re higher in males than in females. The subjects with hyperglycemia had higher plasma homocysteine levels than the subjects without the risk factor. Also the subjects with dislipidemia had higher plasma homocysteine levels than the subjects without the risk factor. The plasma folate and vitamin {TEX}$B_{12}${/TEX} levels were significantly lower in males tan females. However, there were no significant differences in plasma folate and vitamin {TEX}$B_{12}${/TEX} levels between the subjects with or without other risk factors. These results indicate that plasma homocysteine levels were positively related with risk factors for cardiovascular disease and plasma folate levels were negatively related with the risk factors for cardiovascular disease. Also, we conclude that plasmahomocysteine levels might be related to the combination of risk factors, rather than an individual risk factor.