Anti-hepatotoxic Activity of Chrysanthemum coronarium L. var. spatiosum Extract

쑥갓의 간독성 보호작용

  • Kang, Hyun-Jung (Department of Food Science and Technology, Seoul National University of Technology) ;
  • Lee, Eun-Ju (College of Pharmacy, Seoul National University) ;
  • Sung, Sang-Hyun (College of Pharmacy, Seoul National University) ;
  • Kim, Young-Choong (College of Pharmacy, Seoul National University) ;
  • Song, Eun-Sook (Department of Life Science, Sookmyung Women's University) ;
  • Park, Mi-Jung (Department of Visual Optics, Seoul National University of Technology) ;
  • Lee, Heum-Sook (Department of Food Science and Technology, Seoul National University of Technology)
  • 강현정 (서울산업대학교 식품공학과) ;
  • 이은주 (서울대학교 약학대학) ;
  • 성상현 (서울대학교 약학대학) ;
  • 김영중 (서울대학교 약학대학) ;
  • 송은숙 (숙명여자대학교 생명과학과) ;
  • 박미정 (서울산업대학교 안경광학과) ;
  • 이흠숙 (서울산업대학교 식품공학과)
  • Published : 2003.02.01

Abstract

Total methanolic extract of Chrysanthemum coronarium L. var. spatiosum (Compositae) was revealed to have anti-hepatotoxic activity against galactosamine-induced toxicity on primary cultured rat hepatocytes. After successive partitioning with chloroform, n-butanol, and water, the chloroform fraction showed a significant inhibition activity of 51% at 50 ppm, compared with that of silybin, 45.9% at $100\;{\mu}M$. The chloroform fraction was subjected to silica gel column chromatography and yielded active CH-II, CH-V and CH-VI subfractions, and the anti-hepatotoxic activity of these subfractions were 47.6, 56.3, and 23.2%, respectively, at 50 ppm. Total glutathione contents of CH-II, CH-V, and CH-VI increased by 49.8, 43.9, and 47.5% of the control, respectively at 50 ppm, whereas that of silymarin was, 59.7% at $100\;{\mu}M$ after challenged with galactosamine. The ratio of (reduced glutathione) / (total glutathione) in CH-II, CH-V and CH-VI subfraction showed similar values of $0.86{\sim}0.87$ at 50 ppm, whereas that of silymarin was, 0.85 at $100\;{\mu}M$. The incorporation of $[^3H]-uridine$ uptake into RNA was not affected by these active subfractions.

Keywords

Chrysanthemum coronarium L. var. spatiosum;anti-hepatotoxic activity;glutamic pyruvic transaminase;galactosamine;primary cultured rate hepatocytes

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