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Influence of Physiological and Environmental Factors on Growth and Sporulation of an Antagonistic Strain of Trichoderma viride RSR 7

  • Jayaswal, R.K. (Department of Biological Sciences, Illinois State University) ;
  • Singh, Rajesh (Centre of Advanced Studies in Botany, Banaras Hindu University) ;
  • Lee, Youn-Su (Division of Applied Plant Sciences, Kangwon National University)
  • Published : 2003.03.31

Abstract

Influence of physiological and environmental factors on an antagonistic strain of Trichoderma viride RSR7 were studied optimize its biocontrol potential. The growth and sporulation of T. viride was greatly influenced by various carbon and nitrogen sources, and the environmental factors such as pH and temperature. The best growth and sporulation of T. viride was observed when sucrose, peptone and trehalose were supplemented in the medium as sole carbon sources. Rhamnose, pyruvic acid and sorbitol also supported a good growth. However, with these carbon sources the sporulation was poor. Growth and sporulation was also affected by various nitrogen sources. Growth and sporulation both were favoured by ammonium forms of nitrogen compared to nitrite or nitrate forms. Urea did not support either growth or sporulation. Among amino acids, glutamic acid, asparagine, leucine, aspartic acid, glutamic acid and alanine supported good growth as well as sporulation. T. viride was able to utilize large number of amino acids as sole nitrogen source. Proline was good for growth, but not for sporulation. Maximum growth and sporulation of T. viride was between pH 4.5 to 5.5. Temperatures between $20^{\circ}C\;and\;37^{\circ}C$ were good for both growth and sporulation of T. viride. At lower temperatures(i.e. below $20^{\circ}C$) growth and sporulation were inhibited. Based on the present study it may be concluded that T. viride RSR7 is capable of growing and sporulating with varied nutritional and environmental conditions and, therefore, this strain of T. viride may be useful as a biocontrol agent under diverse physiological and environmental conditions.

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