Contents of Heavy Metals in Soybean Curd and Starch Jelly Consumed in Korea

국내 유통 두부류 및 묵류 중 중금속 함량

  • Published : 2005.02.28

Abstract

Contents of heavy metals [mercury (Hg), lead (Pb), cadmium (Cd), and arsenic (As)] in 218 samples including soybean curds (n = 138), processed bean curds (n = 37), starch jellies (n = 33), and mixed starch jellies (n = 10) were determined using mercury analyzer, atomic absorption spectrophotometer (AAS) or inductively coupled plasma spectrometer (ICP). Ranges and means of heavy metals in soybean curds and starch jellies were as follows [min-max (mean) values]: soybean curds -Hg $0.1-8.2(0.3)$, Pb not detectable (ND)-203.9(23.3),\ Cd ND-46.0 (8.1), and As ND-61.3 (0.7)${\mu}g/kg$, starch jellies-Hg 0.1-1.3(0.3)${\mu}g/kg$, Pb ND-90.2(22.4)${\mu}g/kg$, Cd ND-31.0(3.7) and As ND-23.6(1.1)${\mu}g/kg$. Daily intakes of Hg, Pb, and Cd from soybean curds and starch jellies were 0.001-0.3% of Provisional tolerable weekly intake established by FAO/WHO.

Keywords

soybean curd;starch jelly;heavy metal;lead;cadmium

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