Finite Element Stress Analysis of Implant Prosthesis of Internal Connection System According to Position and Direction of Load

임플랜트-지대주의 내측연결 시스템에서 하중의 위치 및 경사에 따른 임플랜트 보철의 유한요소 응력분석

  • Jang, Jong-Seok (Dept of Prosthodontics, College of Dentistry, Chosun University) ;
  • Jeong, Yong-Tae (Dept of Prosthodontics, College of Dentistry, Chosun University) ;
  • Chung, Chae-Heon (Dept of Prosthodontics, College of Dentistry, Chosun University)
  • 장종석 (조선대학교 치과대학 보철학 교실) ;
  • 정용태 (조선대학교 치과대학 보철학 교실) ;
  • 정재헌 (조선대학교 치과대학 보철학 교실)
  • Published : 2005.06.30

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to assess the loading distributing characteristics of implant prosthesis of internal connection system(ITI system) according to position and direction of load, under vertical and inclined loading using finite element analysis (FEA). The finite element model of a synOcta implant and a solid abutment with $8^{\circ}$ internal conical joint used by the ITI implant was constructed. The gold crown for mandibular first molar was made on solid abutment. Each three-dimensional finite element model was created with the physical properties of the implant and surrounding bone. This study simulated loads of 200N at the central fossa in a vertical direction (loading condition A), 200N at the outside point of the central fossa with resin filling into screw hole in a vertical direction (loading condition B), 200N at the centric cusp in a $15^{\circ}$ inward oblique direction (loading condition C), 200N at the in a $30^{\circ}$ inward oblique direction (loading condition D) or 200N at the centric cusp in a $30^{\circ}$ outward oblique direction (loading condition E) individually. Von Mises stresses were recorded and compared in the supporting bone, fixture, and abutment. The following results have been made based on this study: 1. Stresses were concentrated mainly at the ridge crest around implant under both vertical and oblique loading but stresses in the cancellous bone were low under both vertical and oblique loading. 2. Bending moments resulting from non-axial loading of dental implants caused stress concentrations on cortical bone. The magnitude of the stress was greater with the oblique loading than with the vertical loading. 3. An offset of the vertical occlusal force in the buccolingual direction relative to the implant axis gave rise to increased bending of the implant. So, the relative positions of the resultant line of force from occlusal contact and the center of rotation seems to be more important. 4. In this internal conical joint, vertical and oblique loads were resisted mainly by the implant-abutment joint at the screw level and by the implant collar. Conclusively, It seems to be more important that how long the distance is from center of rotation of the implant itself to the resultant line of force from occlusal contact (leverage). In a morse taper implant, vertical and oblique loads are resisted mainly by the implant-abutment joint at the screw level and by the implant collar. This type of implant-abutment connection can also distribute forces deeper within the implant and shield the retention screw from excessive loading. Lateral forces are transmitted directly to the walls of the implant and the implant abutment mating bevels, providing greater resistance to interface opening.

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