Susceptibility of experimental animals to reinfection with Clonorchis sinensis

  • Sohn, Woon-Mok (Department of Parasitology and Institute of Health Sciences, Gyeongsang National University College of Medicine) ;
  • Zhang, Hong-Man (Department of Parasitology and Tropical Medicine, Seoul National University College of Medicine, and Institute of Endemic Diseases, Seoul National University Medical Research Center) ;
  • Choi, Min-Ho (Department of Parasitology and Tropical Medicine, Seoul National University College of Medicine, and Institute of Endemic Diseases, Seoul National University Medical Research Center) ;
  • Hong, Sung-Tae (Department of Parasitology and Tropical Medicine, Seoul National University College of Medicine, and Institute of Endemic Diseases, Seoul National University Medical Research Center)
  • Published : 2006.06.01

Abstract

The present study observed the resistance to reinfection with Clonorchis sinensis in various experimental animals including mice, guinea pigs, rabbits, and dogs, as well as rats and hamsters. The resistance rates to reinfection in rats, mice, hamsters, guinea pigs, rabbits, and dogs were 79.7%, 58.0%, -12.6%, 54.8%, 62.6%, and 6.0%, respectively. Worms recovered from reinfected rats and mice were immature, and significantly smaller than those from the primarily infected (P < 0.01), whereas those from other animals were fully matured to adults. These findings indicate that the protective response against reinfection with C. sinensis is prominent in rats and mice, and that they may be a good animal model to investigate the mechanism of resistance to reinfection with C. sinensis.

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