Physiochemical Characteristics of Corn Starch during the Alkali Gelatinization

알칼리 호화에 따른 옥수수전분의 특성

  • Published : 2007.12.01

Abstract

In this report, we discussed the physiochemical characteristics of corn starch during the alkali gelatinization process. Here, solubility and the amounts of eluted polysaccharides and amyloses increased in proportion to the amount of alkali added. The X-ray diffraction patterns and DSC thermogram showed that in the early stage of alkali gelatinization, crystallinity of the starch granules was disrupted as compared with heat gelatinization. This resulted in the eluted amylose content, while granule sizes were hardly changed in the alkali treated corn starch. The endotherm peak in the DSC thermogram shifted toward a higher temperature region as the degree of gelatinization increased, suggesting that the retained starch granules were more compactly crystallized during alkali gelatinization than during the heat process. Thus, we concluded that during the alkali gelatinization of corn starch, the disruption of weak particles would occur first, before swelling of the granules.

Keywords

corn starch;alkali gelatinization;modified starch

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