Antibacterial activity of sodium phytate, sodium pyrophosphate, and sodium tripolyphosphate against Salmonella typhimurium in meats

  • Hue, Jin-Joo (College of Veterinary Medicine and Research Institute of Veterinary Medicine, Chungbuk National University) ;
  • Baek, Dong-Jin (College of Veterinary Medicine and Research Institute of Veterinary Medicine, Chungbuk National University) ;
  • Lee, Yea Eun (College of Veterinary Medicine and Research Institute of Veterinary Medicine, Chungbuk National University) ;
  • Lee, Ki Nam (College of Veterinary Medicine and Research Institute of Veterinary Medicine, Chungbuk National University) ;
  • Nam, Sang Yoon (College of Veterinary Medicine and Research Institute of Veterinary Medicine, Chungbuk National University) ;
  • Yun, Young Won (College of Veterinary Medicine and Research Institute of Veterinary Medicine, Chungbuk National University) ;
  • Jeong, Jae-Hwang (Department of Bio-industry and Seowon University) ;
  • Lee, Sang-Hwa (Department of Food and Nutrition, Seowon University) ;
  • Yoo, Han Sang (College of Veterinary Medicine, KRF Zoonotic Priority Research Institute and BK21 for Veterinary Science, Seoul National University) ;
  • Lee, Beom Jun (College of Veterinary Medicine and Research Institute of Veterinary Medicine, Chungbuk National University)
  • Accepted : 2007.12.20
  • Published : 2007.12.30

Abstract

The approval of use of certain food-grade phosphates as food additives in a wide variety of meat products greatly stimulated research on the applications of phosphates in foods. Although phosphates have never been classified as antimicrobial agents, a number of investigators have reported that phosphates have antimicrobial activities. Phytic acid is a natural plant inositol hexaphosphate constituting 1-5% of most cereals, nuts, legumes, oil seeds, pollen, and spores. In this study, we investigated antibacterial activities of sodium phytate (SPT), sodium pyrophosphate (SPP), sodium tripolyphosphate (STPP) on Salmonella typhimurium in tryptic soy broth and in row meat media including chicken, pork and beef. SPY, SPP and STPP at the concentrations of 0.5 and 1% dose-dependently inhibited the growth of S. typhimurium in tryptic soy broth at various pHs. The antibacterial activities of SPT and STPP were the stronger than that of SPP. In chicken, pork, and beef, SPT, SPP and STPP at the concentrations of 0.1, 0.5 and 1.0% significantly inhibited the bacterial growth in a dose-dependant manner (p < 0.05). The antibacterial activities of SPT, SPP, and STPP were more effective in chicken than beef. SPT and STPP at the concentration of 1% reduced the bacterial count by about 2 log units. The addition of SPT, SPP and STPP at the concentration of 0.5% in meats increased the meat pHs by 0.28-0.48 units in chicken, pork, and beef. These results suggest that SPT and STPP were equally effective for the inhibition of bacterial growth both in TSB and meat media and that SPT can be used as an animal food additive for increasing shelf-life and functions of meats.

Acknowledgement

Supported by : Chungbuk National University

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