Feline panleukopenia virus infection in imported cats

  • Kang, Sang-Chul (Department of Veterinary Medicine, Cheju National University) ;
  • Kang, Kyung-Il (Department of Pathology, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Georgia) ;
  • Jean, Young-Hwa (National Veterinary Research & Quarantine Service) ;
  • Kim, Jae-Hoon (Department of Veterinary Medicine, Cheju National University)
  • Accepted : 2007.11.16
  • Published : 2007.12.30

Abstract

The cases of feline panleukopenia virus (FPLV) infection were diagnosed in three imported cats. All cats died within one week after mild emaciation, depression and anorexia. One cat showed yellowish watery diarrhea. At necropsy, all cats had segmental hemorrhage on the serosa and mucosa of the small intestine. Histopathologically, severe diffuse necro-hemorrhagic enteritis was observed in small intestine especially in jejunum and ileum. The crypts of Lieberkuhn were dilated and contained necrotic epithelia. Severely damaged epithelia of crypts were transformed into bizarre shapes. Multifocal lympholysis and lymphoid depletion were found in Peyer's patches and other lymphoid tissues. Direct fluorescent antibody (FA) test revealed the characteristic FPLV antigen in the cytoplasms of crypt epithelial cells. Based on the clinical signs, characteristic pathologic findings and FA test, these cases were diagnosed as FPLV infection. In our best knowledge, this study is the first case report for FPLV infection in imported cats in Korea.

References

  1. Baker IK, Van Dreumel AA, Palmer N. The alimentary system, In: Jubb KVF, Kennedy PC, Palmer N (eds.). Pathology of Domestic Animals. 4th ed. pp. 195-198, Academic Press, San Diego, 1993
  2. Foley JE, Orgad D, Hirsh DC, Poland A, Pedersen NC. Outbreak of fatal salmonellosis in cats following use of a high-titer modified-live panleukopenia virus vaccine. J Am Vet Med Assoc 1999, 214, 67-70
  3. Greene CE, Scott FW. Feline panleukopenia. In: Greene CE (ed.), Infectious Diseases of the Dog and Cat. pp. 291-299, WB Saunder, Philadelphia, 1987
  4. Han DU, Kang MI, Kim SH, Chang KT, Kim HS. Studies on major viral diseases of stray cats in Korea. Kor J Vet Publ Hlth 1999, 23, 291-299
  5. Hervas G, Calvo Marques J, Pumarola Batlle M. Cerebellar hypoplasia in the cat. Eur J Comp Anim Prac 1999, 9, 47-52
  6. Ikeda Y, Nakamura K, Miyazawa T, Tohya Y, Takahashi E, Mochizuki M. Feline host range of canine parvovirus: recent emergence of new antigenic types in cats. Emer Infect Dis 2002, 8, 341-346 https://doi.org/10.3201/eid0804.010228
  7. Ikegami T, Shirota K, Goto K, Takakura A, Itoh T, Kawamura S, Dne Y, Nomura Y, Fujiwara K.. Enterocolitis associated with dual infection by Clostridium piliforme and feline panleukopenia virus in three kittens. Vet Pathol 1999, 36, 613-615 https://doi.org/10.1354/vp.36-6-613
  8. Kahn DE. Pathogenesis offeline panleukopenia. J Am Vet Med Assoc 1978, 173, 628-630
  9. Lee SM, Yoon IJ, Choi HW, Lee KJ, Lee KY, Kim MK. Effects of a trivalent (FPY, FHY, FCV) inactivated vaccine in kittens. Korean J Vet Res 2005, 45, 311-323
  10. Pedersen NC. Feline panleukopenia virus. In: Appel MJ (ed.). Virus Infections of Carnivores. pp. 247-254, Elsevier Science, Amsterdam, 1987
  11. Quinn PJ, Markey BK, Carter ME, Donnelly WJ, Leonard FC. Veterinary Microbiology and Microbial Disease. pp. 346-351, Blackwell Publishing, Oxford, 2002
  12. Sharp NJH, Davis BJ, Guy JS, Cullen JM, Steingold SF, Kornegay IN. Hydranencephaly and cerebellar hypoplasia in two kittens attributed to intrauterine parvovirus infection. J Comp Pathol 1999, 121, 39-53 https://doi.org/10.1053/jcpa.1998.0298
  13. Shin NS, Kwon SW, Lee GH, Kim DY, Lee JK, Kim BH. Feline panleukopenia virus infection in a bengal tiger (Panthera tigris tigris). Korean J Vet Pathol 2000, 4, 59-60