Characteristics of a NDV isolated from apparently healthy wild spot-billed ducks (Anas poecilorhyncha)

흰뺨검둥오리(Anas poecilorhyncha)에서 분리된 뉴캣슬병 바이러스의 특성

  • Choi, Kang-Seuk (National Veterinary Research Institute, National Veterinary Research and Quarantine Service) ;
  • Lee, Eun-Kyoung (National Veterinary Research Institute, National Veterinary Research and Quarantine Service) ;
  • Jeon, Woo-Jin (National Veterinary Research Institute, National Veterinary Research and Quarantine Service) ;
  • Kwon, Jun-Hun (National Veterinary Research Institute, National Veterinary Research and Quarantine Service) ;
  • Yang, Chang-Bum (National Veterinary Research Institute, National Veterinary Research and Quarantine Service)
  • 최강석 (국립수의과학검역원 동물위생연구소) ;
  • 이은경 (국립수의과학검역원 동물위생연구소) ;
  • 전우진 (국립수의과학검역원 동물위생연구소) ;
  • 권준헌 (국립수의과학검역원 동물위생연구소) ;
  • 양창범 (국립수의과학검역원 동물위생연구소)
  • Accepted : 2008.06.03
  • Published : 2008.08.01

Abstract

Newcastle disease virus (NDV) is the causative agent of a highly contagious and devastating Newcastle disease of poultry. A NDV (isolate DK1/07) was isolated from apparently healthy wild spot-billed ducks (Anas poecilorhyncha) captured at upper branch of the SapGyo Creek in Chungbuk province, Korea during early 2007. The DK1/07 isolate of minimum chicken embryo lethal dose killed all SPF chicken embryos within 60 h. The cleavage site of the F protein possessed the amino acid sequence $^{112}R-R-Q-K-R-F^{117}$, which is a motif characteristic of virulent NDV strains. The F protein-based phylogenetic analysis revealed that the DK1/07 duck isolate was included in the cluster of genotype VIId and most closely related to recent NDV isolates obtained from chicken farms in Korea. Epidemiological importance of virulent NDV from wild duck is discussed.

Acknowledgement

Supported by : 국립수의과학검역원

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