The Usefulness of Cephalic Vein Cut-Down for Totally Implantable Central Venous Port in Children

소아에서 완전 이식형 중심정맥포트를 위한 두정맥 절개술의 유용성

  • Jung, Kyu-Whan (Department of Pediatric Surgery, Seoul National University Children's Hospital) ;
  • Moon, Suk-Bae (Department of Pediatric Surgery, Seoul National University Children's Hospital) ;
  • Jung, Sung-Eun (Department of Pediatric Surgery, Seoul National University Children's Hospital) ;
  • Lee, Seong-Cheol (Department of Pediatric Surgery, Seoul National University Children's Hospital) ;
  • Park, Kwi-Won (Department of Pediatric Surgery, Seoul National University Children's Hospital)
  • 정규환 (서울대학교병원 소아외과) ;
  • 문석배 (서울대학교병원 소아외과) ;
  • 정성은 (서울대학교병원 소아외과) ;
  • 이성철 (서울대학교병원 소아외과) ;
  • 박귀원 (서울대학교병원 소아외과)
  • Received : 2007.12.06
  • Accepted : 2008.01.10
  • Published : 2008.06.30

Abstract

The usefulness of totally implantable central venous port for long-term intravenous infusion is widely accepted in children. Usually the catheters are placed through the internal or external jugular vein. In case of jugular vein cut-down, two separate incisions are needed for catheter and port respectively. Patients also feel uncomfortable as the catheter run through the neck. However these disadvantages can be overcome by using the cephalic vein (CV). We reviewed our experiences on CV cut-down for totally implantable central venous port in children. From January 2002 to December 2006, 201 patients (M:F=127:74) underwent 218 central venous port insertions. Mean age at operation was 5.9 years (2 months - 19 years). Indications included chemotherapy (N=167), long-term intravenous antibiotics infusion (N=36), and total parenteral nutrition (N=15). CV was selected preferentially. The incision includes the deltopectoral triangle laterally, and both the CV cut-down and port insertion were achieved with a single incision. The number of insertion through external, internal jugular vein, and CV was 77, 66 and 75, respectively. The median age, height and body weight were higher in CV cut-down group. The youngest age for CV cut-down was 8 months, the shortest height was 69 cm and the smallest body weight was 5.9 kg. Of 118 trials of CV cut-down, cut-down was successful in 75 cases (63.6 %). CV was absent in 10 cases(8.4 %) and CV was sacrificed after catheter tip malposition in 10 cases (8.4 %). There was only one complication, in which the catheter was inserted into the minute branch of subclavian artery. The CV cut-down method for totally implantable central venous port was safe and feasible in selected groups of patients in children. In addition, preservation of jugular vein and a more favorable cosmetic effect are other benefits of CV cut-down.