Application of Functional Carbohydrates as a Substitute for Inorganic Polyphosphate in Pork Meat Processing

돈육 가공에서 기능성 탄수화물을 이용한 인산염 대체 소재 개발

  • Published : 2008.02.28

Abstract

Guar gum, ${\kappa}$-carrageenan, alginic acid and chitosan were applied to pork as a model system, and evaluated as a substitute for inorganic polyphosphate, which is one of the essential additives in conventional meat processing. The tested materials did not alter the fat content or pH of the pork meat; however, they did affect water holding capacity and cooking loss significantly. The pork with added guar gum and ${\kappa}$-carrageenan exhibited lower cooking loss than the pork with added polyphosphate. Also, theses materials showed no negative coloring effect within the pork meat blends, which suggest the possibility for their application in final products. In addition, the pork processed with guar gum showed a similar emulsion stability to that with polyphosphate. Overall, guar gum and ${\kappa}$-carrageenan were confirmed as possible substitutes for inorganic polyphosphate.

Keywords

inorganic polyphosphate;guar gum${\kappa}$-carrageenan;alginic acid;chitosan

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