DOI QR코드

DOI QR Code

Multi-focal Microscopic System Using a Fiber Bundle

광섬유 다발을 이용한 다초점 현미경

  • Gu, Young-Mo (Department of Physics, College of Natural Sciences, University of Incheon) ;
  • Ham, Hyo-Shick (Department of Physics, College of Natural Sciences, University of Incheon) ;
  • Choi, Sung-Eul (Department of Physics, College of Natural Sciences, University of Incheon)
  • 구영모 (인천대학교 자연과학대학 물리학과) ;
  • 함효식 (인천대학교 자연과학대학 물리학과) ;
  • 최성을 (인천대학교 자연과학대학 물리학과)
  • Published : 2009.12.25

Abstract

We have constructed and analyzed the performance of a simple fiber bundle multi-focal microscope. The microscope had a fiber bundle substituted for micro-lens array that is the core part of MMM(multi-focal multi-photon microscope). The MMM is a type of confocal microscope. To analyze the performance and characteristics of the fiber bundle multi-focal microscope, three types of samples were used: a standard grating, USAF 1951(7, 3), and 1951(7, 6). Using two polarizers and a polarizing beam splitter, we eliminated noise and got clear images. We obtained the FWHM of fiber spot images with the standard grating using two different magnifier lenses which were 63X and 20X, and found an image of the sample as a distribution of fiber spot images. For this case we used the low magnification lens, which gives denser distribution, so that we could get clearer images. In order to test the resolution of the fiber bundle multi-focal microscopic system, we used the USAF 1951 sample which has a smaller line interval than that of the standard grating. The FWHM of the line width of the image coincides well with the real line width of the USAF 1951 sample. We confirmed the performance of a fiber bundle multi-focal microscopic system which is relatively simple but has submicron resolution and is able to get 1600 images at the same time.

References

  1. G. Q. Xiao, T. R. Corle, and G. S. Kino, “Real-time confocal scanning optical microscope,” Appl. Phys. Lett. 53, 716-718 (1988) https://doi.org/10.1063/1.99814
  2. G. S. Kino, “Intermediate optics in Nipkow disk microscopes,” in Handbook of Biological Confocal Microscopy, 2nd ed., J. B. Pawley, ed. (Plenum Press, New York, USA, 1995), pp. 155-165
  3. R. Y. Tsien and B. J. Bacskai, “Video-rate confocal microscopy,” in Handbook of Biological Confocal Microscopy, 2nd ed., J. B. Pawley, ed. (Plenum Press, New York, USA, 1995), pp. 459-478
  4. V. Iyer, B. E. Losavio, and P. Saggau, “Compensation of spatial and temporal dispersion for acoustic-optic multiphoton laser-scanning microscopy,” J. Biom. Opt. 8, 460-471 (2003) https://doi.org/10.1117/1.1580827
  5. M. Muller, Introduction to Confocal Fluorescence Microscopy (SPIE Press, 2006), pp. 36
  6. D. B. Murphy, Fundamentals of Light Microscopy and Electronic Imaging (WILEY-LISS, 2001), pp. 229-230
  7. E. S. Shin and K. B. Nahm, “Fabrication and studies on the properties of a spinning . disk confocal microscope,” Hankook Kwanghak Hoeji (Korean J. Opt. Photon.) 8, 225-229 (2007)
  8. A. Egner, V. Andresen, and S. W. Hell, “Comparison of the axial resolution of practical Nipkow-disk confocal fluorescence microscopy with that of multifocal multiphoton microscopy: theory and experiment,” J. Microsc. 206, 24-32(2002) https://doi.org/10.1046/j.1365-2818.2002.01001.x
  9. J. B. Pawley, Handbook of Biological Confocal Microscopy, 3rd ed. (Springer Science & Business Media, New York, USA, 2006), pp. 550-559
  10. D. N. Fittinghoff, C. B. Schaffer, E. Mazur, and J. A. Squier, “Time-decorrelated multi-focal micro-machining and trapping,” IEEE J. Select. Topics Quantum Electron. 7, 559-566 (2001) https://doi.org/10.1109/2944.974227