Analysis of Patients with Dysesthesia after Mandibular Nerve Injury

하악신경 손상 후 발생한 감각부전 환자들에 대한 분석

  • Choi, Young-Chan (Department of Orofacial pain & Oral medicine, College of Dentistry, Yonsei University) ;
  • Kwon, Jeong-Seung (Department of Orofacial pain & Oral medicine, College of Dentistry, Yonsei University) ;
  • Kim, Seong-Taek (Department of Orofacial pain & Oral medicine, College of Dentistry, Yonsei University) ;
  • Ahn, Hyung-Joon (Department of Orofacial pain & Oral medicine, College of Dentistry, Yonsei University)
  • 최영찬 (연세대학교 치과대학 구강내과학교실) ;
  • 권정승 (연세대학교 치과대학 구강내과학교실) ;
  • 김성택 (연세대학교 치과대학 구강내과학교실) ;
  • 안형준 (연세대학교 치과대학 구강내과학교실)
  • Published : 2009.12.30

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to present basic data that is needed in comprehension of dysesthesia after mandibular nerve injury and grasp meaning. We analyzed medical records of 59 patients who were diagnosed as dysesthesia after mandibular nerve injury from January 2007 to July 2009. The results are summarized as follows. 1. The most frequent cause was implant surgery (59%) and the most frequent injured branch of mandibular nerve was inferior alveolar nerve(81%). 2. The period passed after nerve injury showed significant interrelationship with level of pain. Visual Analogue Scale(VAS) increased from 4.82 to 6.91 after 6 month. 3. The period passed after nerve injury did not show significant interrelationship with recovery of dysesthesia. But, when conservative treatment was offered at earlier stage, ratio of patients who showed recovery of symptom tended to increase. 4. In computed tomography, level of invasion into inferior alveolar nerve canal did not show significant interrelationship with level of pain and recovery of dysesthesia. Conclusively, in the patients with dysesthesia of mandibular nerve, inferior alveolar nerve injury by dental implant surgery dominated most significant problem. Although level of invasion into inferior alveolar nerve is the most important factor to initiation of dysesthesia, there are other various factors exert more influence on the level of pain or recovery of dysesthesia. Therefore, begining conservative therapy at earlier stage is encouraged. Also, because nerve injuries can occur without direct invasion into nerve canal, so leaving enough safe space from nerve canal is needed for prevention of indirect nerve injury.

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