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Critical Review on Evaporative Loss of Semivolatile Aerosols during Sampling

  • Received : 2010.03.10
  • Accepted : 2010.05.11
  • Published : 2010.06.30

Abstract

Semivolatile aerosols exist as vapor and particles at the same time in room temperature and each phase has different intake and uptake mechanisms. This characteristic requires substantial consideration during exposure assessment of semivolatile aerosol. Some sampling methods for solid particles pose high possibility of evaporative loss during sampling. Therefore, when establishing sampling strategy for them, the factors affecting the phase distribution of semivolatile aerosol should be counted including semivolatile aerosol of interest and sampling methods used. Evaluation for phase distributions of semivolatile aerosols is also recommended. Metalworking fluids, pesticides, asphalt fumes, diesel exhaust, and environmental tobacco smoke are common health-related semivolatile aerosols in workplaces.

Keywords

semivolatile aerosol;semivolatile organic compound;evaporative loss;vapor phase;particle phase

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