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Effect of variable degrees of jejunal resection upon different clinico-biochemical parameters in dogs

  • Dilawer, Muhammad Sohail (Veterinary Research Institute, Zarrar Shaheed Road) ;
  • Khan, Muhammad Arif (Department of Clinical Medicine and Surgery, University of Veterinary and Animal Sciences) ;
  • Abidin, Zain ul (Veterinary Research Institute, Zarrar Shaheed Road) ;
  • Azeem, Shahan (Department of Clinical Medicine and Surgery, University of Veterinary and Animal Sciences) ;
  • Majeed, Khalid Abdul (Department of Clinical Medicine and Surgery, University of Veterinary and Animal Sciences) ;
  • Shahbaz, Adeel (Department of Clinical Medicine and Surgery, University of Veterinary and Animal Sciences) ;
  • Khan, Aamir Riaz (Veterinary Research Institute, Zarrar Shaheed Road)
  • Received : 2011.10.24
  • Accepted : 2011.11.24
  • Published : 2011.12.30

Abstract

Dogs are considered to be the best companions of human beings due to their loyalty, obedience and pleasant disposition. Jejunum is the largest part of small intestine mainly involved in absorption of nutrients. Jejunal resection up to 80% allows normal weight gain while resection up to 90% increased morbidity and mortality. In the present study, 20 dogs were divided into 4 groups based on the degree of jejunal resection i.e. A (70% resection), B (80% resection) and C (100% resection) while group D served as control. Dogs in the 70% and 80% jejunal resection group showed normal growth and function while 100% jejunal resection resulted in weight loss and alteration of hematological and biochemical parameters.

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