DOI QR코드

DOI QR Code

Growth Promotion of Tobacco Plant by 3-hydroxy-2-Butanone from Bacillus vallismortis EXTN-1

  • Ann, Mi Na (Microbial Plant Activation Lab, Division of Agricultural Microbiology, Department of Crop Life Safety, National Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Rural Development Administration) ;
  • Cho, Yung Eun (Microbial Plant Activation Lab, Division of Agricultural Microbiology, Department of Crop Life Safety, National Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Rural Development Administration) ;
  • Ryu, Ho Jin (Microbial Plant Activation Lab, Division of Agricultural Microbiology, Department of Crop Life Safety, National Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Rural Development Administration) ;
  • Kim, Heung Tae (Department of Plant Medicine, College of Agriculture, Life and Environment Science, Chungbuk National University) ;
  • Park, Kyungseok (Microbial Plant Activation Lab, Division of Agricultural Microbiology, Department of Crop Life Safety, National Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Rural Development Administration)
  • Received : 2013.11.22
  • Accepted : 2013.12.13
  • Published : 2013.12.31

Abstract

It has been well documented that Bacillus vallismortis strain EXTN-1, a beneficial rhizosphere bacterium, could enhance plant growth and induce systemic resistance to diverse pathogens in plants. However, the molecular mechanisms for how the EXTN-1 promote plant growth and induce resistances to diverse pathogens. Here, we show that 3-Hydroxy-2-butanone, a volatile organic compound (VOCs) emitted from the EXTN1, is a key factor for the bacteria-mediated beneficial effects on plant growth and defense systems. We found that the presence of volatile signals of EXTN-1 resulted in growth promotion of tobacco seedlings. The identification and analysis of EXTN-1-secreted volatile signals by solid-phase microextraction (SPME) and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) indicated that a 3-hydroxy-2-butanone could provide not only the plant growth promotion, but also higher resistance against Pectobacterium carotovorum SCC1. These results suggest that a volatile compound released from EXTN-1 enhances the plant growth promotion and immunity of plants.

References

  1. Bailly, A. and L. Weisskopf (2012) The modulating effect of bacterial volatiles on plant growth: current knowledge and future challenges. Plant Signal Behav 7:79-85. https://doi.org/10.4161/psb.7.1.18418
  2. Blom, D., C. Fabbi, E. C. Connor, F. P. Schiestd, D. R. Klauser, T. Boller, L. Eberl and L. Weisskopf (2011). Production of plant growth modulating volatiles is widespread among rhizosphere bacteria and strongly depends on culture conditions. Environ Microbiol. 13:3047-58. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1462-2920.2011.02582.x
  3. Farag, M. A., C. M. Ryu, L. W. Sumner and P. W. Pare (2006) GC-MS SPME profiling of rhizobacterial volatiles reveals prospective inducers of growth promotion and induced systemic resistance in plants. Phytochemistry. 67:2262-2268 https://doi.org/10.1016/j.phytochem.2006.07.021
  4. Kloepper, J. W., J. Leong, M. Teintze and M. N. Schroth (1980) Enhanced plant growth by. siderophores produced by plant growth promoting rhizobacteria. Nature. 286:885-886. https://doi.org/10.1038/286885a0
  5. Kloepper, J. W., R. Rodriguez-Kabana, G. W. Zehnder, J. Murphy, E. Sikora and C. Fernandez (1999) Plant rootbacterial interactions in biological control of soilborne diseases and potential extension to systemic and foliar diseases. Australas. Plant Path. 28:21-26. https://doi.org/10.1071/AP99003
  6. Lee, B., M. A. Farag, H. B. Park, J. W. Kloepper, S. H. Lee and C. M. Ryu (2012) Induced resistance by a long-chain bacterial volatile : elicitation of plant systemic defense by a C13 volatile produced by paenibacillus polymaxa, PLoS One. 7:e48744. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0048744
  7. Leong, J. (1986) Siderophores : Their biochemistry and possible role in the biocontrol of plant pathogens. Annu. Rev. Phytopathol. 24:187-209. https://doi.org/10.1146/annurev.py.24.090186.001155
  8. Marco, K., H. Maria, M. Francia, P. Anja, S. Birte and P. Birgit (2009) Bacterial volatiles and their action potential. Appl. Microbiol. Biotechnol. 81:1001-1012. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00253-008-1760-3
  9. Pare, P. W., M. A. Farag, V. Krishnamachari, H. Zhang, C. M. Ryu and J. W. Kloepper (2005) Elicitors and priming agents initiate plant defense responses. Photosynth. Res. 85:149-159. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11120-005-1001-x
  10. Park, K. S., D. Paul, Y. K. Kim, K. W. Nam, Y. K. Lee, H. W Choi and S. Y. Lee (2007) Induced Systemic Resistance by Bacillus vallismortis EXTN-1 Suppressed bacterial Wilt in Tomato Caused by Ralstonia solanacearum. Plant Pathol J. 23:22-25. https://doi.org/10.5423/PPJ.2007.23.1.022
  11. Ryu, C. M., M. A. Farag, C. H. Hu, M. S. Reddy, H. X. Wei, P. W. Pare and J. W. Kloepper (2003) Bacterial volatiles promote growth in Arabidopsis. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. 100:4927-4932. https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.0730845100
  12. Ryu, C. M., M. A. Farag, C. H. Hu, M. S. Reddy, J. W. Kloepper and P. W. Pare (2004) Bacterial volatiles induce systemic resistance in Arabidopsis. Plant Physiol. 134: 1017-1026. https://doi.org/10.1104/pp.103.026583
  13. Ryu, C. M., M. A. Farag, P. W. Pare and J. W. Kloepper (2005) Invisible signals from the underground: bacterial volatiles elicit plant growth promotion and induce systemic resistance. Plant Pathol J. 21:7-12. https://doi.org/10.5423/PPJ.2005.21.1.007

Cited by

  1. Rhizosphere Inhibition of Cucumber Fusarium Wilt by Different Surfactinexcreting Strains of Bacillus subtilis vol.31, pp.2, 2015, https://doi.org/10.5423/PPJ.OA.10.2014.0113
  2. Are Bacterial Volatile Compounds Poisonous Odors to a Fungal Pathogen Botrytis cinerea, Alarm Signals to Arabidopsis Seedlings for Eliciting Induced Resistance, or Both? vol.7, pp.1664-302X, 2016, https://doi.org/10.3389/fmicb.2016.00196
  3. Volatile organic compounds emitted by Bacillus sp. JC03 promote plant growth through the action of auxin and strigolactone vol.87, pp.2, 2019, https://doi.org/10.1007/s10725-018-00473-z