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A Phenomenological Study on Early Entrance Experiences of Science Gifted High School Students

과학영재학교 조기입학 경험에 대한 현상학적 탐색

  • Received : 2013.01.30
  • Accepted : 2013.02.25
  • Published : 2013.02.28

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to explore the meaning of early entrance experiences of science gifted high school students. The subjects were 13 students who are attending science gifted high school in Seoul. The research data were collected through in-depth interviews. The qualitative study applied the phenomenological method of Giorgi. The early entrance experiences of science gifted high school students were clustered into 13 specific themes and 5 general structures. The results indicated that the early entrance students were surprised by their admissions from the school and they worry about their lack of readiness. However, they follow up their missed 1 year study after all. It took from a few weeks to 1~2 years depending on the student. At any rate, the environment of the school such as differentiated curricular, dormitory life, and studying atmospheres were helpful for the students to adopt easily. Even though they sometimes show a little deficiency, it won't be an issue, they just corporate each other and pursue their studies. As time goes on, they become friends even though they call other students 'big brother'. When the placement of gifted students take place, we do not need to hesitate because of their age, but need to consider the environment of school and characteristics of student.

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