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Fabrication Process of Single CuO Nanowire Devices

  • Vu, Xuan Hien (School of Materials Science and Engineering, Kyungpook National University) ;
  • Jo, Kwang-Min (School of Materials Science and Engineering, Kyungpook National University) ;
  • Kim, Se-Yun (School of Materials Science and Engineering, Kyungpook National University) ;
  • Lee, Joon-Hyung (School of Materials Science and Engineering, Kyungpook National University) ;
  • Kim, Jeong-Joo (School of Materials Science and Engineering, Kyungpook National University) ;
  • Heo, Young-Woo (School of Materials Science and Engineering, Kyungpook National University)
  • Received : 2014.05.27
  • Accepted : 2014.05.30
  • Published : 2014.05.30

Abstract

One-dimensional nanostructures such as nanowires have been extensively investigated as a promising type of material for applications of nanoscale technology. The fabrication of single-nanowire devices are consequently important and interesting. This study introduced a feasible method for growing CuO nanowires on Cu foils. The nanowires had diameters of 10~150 nm and lengths of more than $7{\mu}m$ and were grown by means of thermal oxidation in a vacuum. They were entirely and uniformly grown over the Cu foil surfaces and could be extracted and dispersed in an ethanol solution for further purposes. In addition, a simple fabrication method for realizing device functionality from a single CuO nanowire was reported. Fabricated devices were carefully checked by field-emission scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The probability of the realization of a single-CuO-nanowire device relative to that of all other types was estimated to be around 25%. Finally, the I-V characteristics of the devices were analyzed.

Acknowledgement

Supported by : National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF)

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