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Variation of glucosinolate contents of 'Sinhongssam' grown under various light sources, periods, and light intensities

광원의 종류, 주기와 세기의 변화에 따른 '신홍쌈' 배추 내 글루코시놀레이트 함량

  • Lee, Geon-Ryoung (Department of Bio-Environmental Chemistry, Chungnam National University) ;
  • Kim, Young Jin (Department of Bio-Environmental Chemistry, Chungnam National University) ;
  • Chun, Jin-Hyuk (Department of Bio-Environmental Chemistry, Chungnam National University) ;
  • Lee, Min-Ki (Department of Bio-Environmental Chemistry, Chungnam National University) ;
  • Ryu, Dong-Ki (Department of Biosystems Machinery Engineering, Chungnam National University) ;
  • Park, Suhyoung (Department of Horticultural Crop Research, National Institute of Horticultural and Herbal Science (NIHHS), Rural Development Administration (RDA)) ;
  • Chung, Sun-Ok (Department of Biosystems Machinery Engineering, Chungnam National University) ;
  • Park, Sang Un (Department of Crop Science, Chungnam National University,) ;
  • Lim, Yong-Pyo (Department of Horticultural Science, Chungnam National University) ;
  • Kim, Sun-Ju (Department of Bio-Environmental Chemistry, Chungnam National University)
  • 이건령 (충남대학교 생물환경화학과) ;
  • 김영진 (충남대학교 생물환경화학과) ;
  • 천진혁 (충남대학교 생물환경화학과) ;
  • 이민기 (충남대학교 생물환경화학과) ;
  • 류동기 (충남대학교 바이오시스템기계공학과) ;
  • 박수형 (농촌진흥청 국립원예특작과학원) ;
  • 정선옥 (충남대학교 바이오시스템기계공학과) ;
  • 박상언 (충남대학교 식물자원학과) ;
  • 임용표 (충남대학교 원예학과) ;
  • 김선주 (충남대학교 생물환경화학과)
  • Received : 2014.05.29
  • Accepted : 2014.06.30
  • Published : 2014.06.30

Abstract

The variation of glucosinolates (GSLs) in Chinese cabbage ('Sinhongssam') (Brassica rapa L. spp. pekinensis) cultivated under lights to control plant growth conditions was evaluated at different development stages. Under experimental conditions in plant factory system, plant growth conditions including light, temperature, and nutrients were designed to enhance GSLs. The variation of glucosinolates (GSLs) in Chinese cabbage ('Sinhongssam') (Brassica rapa L. spp. pekinensis) cultivated under lights to control plant growth conditions was evaluated at different development stages. Under experimental conditions in plant factory system, plant growth conditions including light, temperature, and nutrients were designed to enhance GSLs. The contents of GSLs were quantified in Chinese cabbage according to different light sources (Red+White, RW; Red+Blue+White, RBW, Fluorescence lamp, FL) at development stages (28, 42, and 56 days after sowing, DAS) using HPLC. Nine GSLs including five aliphatic (progoitrin, sinigrin, glucoalyssin, gluconapin, and glucobrassicanapin) three indolyl (glucobrassicin, 4-methoxyglucobrassicin, and neoglucobrassicin), and one aromatic (gluconasturtiin) GSLs were identified based on peak retention time in previous results of our laboratory. GSL contents were higher in RBW (36.55) and lower in FL ($15.24{\mu}mol/g/\;DW$). Results revealed that GSL contents were higher under controlled photoperiods (20/4 h) ($58.35{\mu}mol/g\;DW$) and controlled light intensity ($160{\mu}mol/m^2/s$) ($34.02{\mu}mol/g\;DW$), respectively. Lower amount of progoitrin and comparatively higher amount of glucobrassicin and gluconasturtiin was noted in Chinese cabbage cultivated under FL light (2.38, 9.82, and 2.10) at 42 DAS, photoperiod 20/4 h (3.16, 2.52, and 1.30) at 28 DAS, and light intensity at $130{\mu}mol/m^2/s$ (2.28, 2.24, and $1.51{\mu}mol/g\;DW$) at 42 DAS. Therefore FL light, photoperiod (20/4 h), and light intensity ($130{\mu}mol/m^2/s$) were considered as most suitable for the enhancement of GSLs in Chinese cabbage.

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