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Responses of Blood Glucose, Insulin, Glucagon, and Fatty Acids to Intraruminal Infusion of Propionate in Hanwoo

  • Oh, Y.K. (National Institute of Animal Science, Rural Development Administration) ;
  • Eun, J.S. (CJ Cooperation Feed & Livestock) ;
  • Lee, S.C. (National Institute of Animal Science, Rural Development Administration) ;
  • Chu, G.M. (NongHyuopFeed INC) ;
  • Lee, Sung S. (Division of Applied Life Science(BK21+), Gyeongsang National University) ;
  • Moon, Y.H. (Department of Animal Science and Biotechnology, Gyeongnam National University of Science and Technology)
  • Received : 2014.07.02
  • Accepted : 2014.08.31
  • Published : 2015.02.01

Abstract

This study was carried out to investigate the effects of intraruminal infusion of propionate on ruminal fermentation characteristics and blood hormones and metabolites in Hanwoo (Korean cattle) steers. Four Hanwoo steers (average body wt. 270 kg, 13 month of age) equipped with rumen cannula were infused into rumens with 0.0 M (Water, C), 0.5 M (37 g/L, T1), 1.0 M (74 g/L, T2) and 1.5 M (111 g/L, T3) of propionate for 1 hour per day and allotted by $4{\times}4$ Latin square design. On the 5th day of infusion, samples of rumen and blood were collected at 0, 60, 120, 180, and 300 min after intraruminal infusion of propionate. The concentrations of serum glucose and plasma glucagon were not affected (p>0.05) by intraruminal infusion of propionate. The serum insulin concentration at 60 min after infusion was significantly (p<0.05) higher in T3 than in C, while the concentration of non-esterified fatty acid (NEFA) at 60 and 180 min after infusion was significantly (p<0.05) lower in the propionate treatments than in C. Hence, intraruminal infusion of propionate stimulates the secretion of insulin, and decreases serum NEFA concentration rather than the change of serum glucose concentration.

Keywords

Rumen;Propionate Infusion;Hormones;Steer

Acknowledgement

Grant : 농생명산업차세대인재육성사업단

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