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Data analysis for improving population management in animal shelters in Seoul

  • Cho, Yoon Ju (Department of Pet Science, Seojeong College) ;
  • Lee, Young-Ah (Department of Animal Science, Shingu College) ;
  • Hwang, Bo Ram (The Institute for the 3Rs and Department of Laboratory Animal Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine Konkuk University) ;
  • Kim, Hyung Joon (The Institute for the 3Rs and Department of Laboratory Animal Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine Konkuk University) ;
  • Han, Jin Soo (The Institute for the 3Rs and Department of Laboratory Animal Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine Konkuk University)
  • Received : 2015.01.15
  • Accepted : 2015.05.06
  • Published : 2015.06.30

Abstract

A total of 11,395 animals were impounded in shelters in Seoul in 2013. The Animal Protection Division of the Seoul metropolitan government has annual contracts with local veterinary associations as well as Korean animal rescue and management organizations for providing shelter to animals, and collects monthly statistics from these groups. In 2013, the collected intake and outcome data for 25 districts were reviewed to analyze shelter capacity in terms of housing capacity (monthly daily average intake, required holding capacity, and adoption-driven capacity), staff capacity (staff hours required for daily care), and live release rate. Seasonal variations in the monthly daily average intake were observed, indicating that management of these shelters requires various strategies. This study was performed to analyze and interpret meaningful statistics for improving the efficiency of animal shelters in Seoul. However, inconsistent collection of animal statistics limited data compilation. Creation of a basic animal statistics matrix with reference to well-designed matrices from recognized professional animal shelters is essential. These complied statistical data will help plan for future animal shelter needs in Seoul.

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