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Expression analysis of ciliary rootlet coiled coil protein mRNA during Xenopus development

  • Rahman, Md. Mahfujur (College of Veterinary Medicine and Bio-Safety Research Institute, Chonbuk National University) ;
  • Kim, In-Shik (College of Veterinary Medicine and Bio-Safety Research Institute, Chonbuk National University) ;
  • Ahn, Dong-Choon (College of Veterinary Medicine and Bio-Safety Research Institute, Chonbuk National University) ;
  • Cho, Ho-Seong (College of Veterinary Medicine and Bio-Safety Research Institute, Chonbuk National University) ;
  • Kim, Won-Il (College of Veterinary Medicine and Bio-Safety Research Institute, Chonbuk National University) ;
  • Kim, Bumseok (College of Veterinary Medicine and Bio-Safety Research Institute, Chonbuk National University) ;
  • Shin, Gee-Wook (College of Veterinary Medicine and Bio-Safety Research Institute, Chonbuk National University) ;
  • Kwon, Jungkee (College of Veterinary Medicine and Bio-Safety Research Institute, Chonbuk National University) ;
  • Akanda, Rashedunnabi (College of Veterinary Medicine and Bio-Safety Research Institute, Chonbuk National University) ;
  • Park, Byung-Yong (College of Veterinary Medicine and Bio-Safety Research Institute, Chonbuk National University)
  • Received : 2015.01.22
  • Accepted : 2015.08.18
  • Published : 2015.09.30

Abstract

Ciliary rootlet coiled coil protein (CROCC), the structural component that originates from the basal body at the proximal end of the ciliary rootlet, plays a crucial role in maintaining the cellular integrity of ciliated cells. In the current study, we cloned Xenopus CROCC and performed the expression analysis. The amino acid sequence of Xenopus laevis was related to those of Drosophila, cow, goat, horse, chicken, mouse and human. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction analysis revealed that CROCC mRNA encoding a coiled coil protein was present maternally, as well as throughout early development. In situ hybridization indicated that CROCC mRNA occurred in the animal pole of embryo during gastrulation and subsequently in the presumptive neuroectoderm at the end of gastrulation. At tailbud stages, CROCC mRNA expression was localized in the anterior roof plate of the developing brain, pharyngeal epithelium connected to gills, esophagus, olfactory placode, intestine and nephrostomes of the pronephric kidney. Our study suggests that CROCC may be responsible for control of the development of various ciliated organs.

Acknowledgement

Supported by : Korea Research Foundation

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