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The Effects of Two Different Feeding Systems on Blood Metabolites in Holstein Heifers and the Economic Impact Analysis of the Feeding Systems

  • Kim, Tae Il (Dairy Science Division, National Institute of Animal Science, Rural Development Administration) ;
  • Vijayakumar, Mayakrishnan (Dairy Science Division, National Institute of Animal Science, Rural Development Administration) ;
  • Ki, Kwang Seok (Dairy Science Division, National Institute of Animal Science, Rural Development Administration) ;
  • Kim, Ki Young (Grassland and Forage Division, National Institute of Animal Science, Rural Development Administration) ;
  • Park, Boem Young (Dairy Science Division, National Institute of Animal Science, Rural Development Administration) ;
  • Sung, Kyung il (College of Animal Life Science, Kangwon National University) ;
  • Lim, Dong Hyun (Dairy Science Division, National Institute of Animal Science, Rural Development Administration)
  • Received : 2016.09.26
  • Accepted : 2016.11.17
  • Published : 2016.12.31

Abstract

The objective of this research was to evaluate the effects of two different feeding systems on blood metabolites in Holstein heifers and analyze the economic impacts of the feeding systems. The following two experiments were conducted to investigate the effects of feeding system on blood metabolite changes in Holstein heifers and analyze the economic impacts of the two systems. In experiment 1, the effects of two different feeding systems on cortisol, progesterone, and estradiol in Holstein heifers were examined. In experiment 2, the effects of two different feeding systems on the body weights of Holstein heifers and profitability of the two feeding systems were studied. Results showed that the pasture-raised heifers showed significantly decrease in the levels of blood cortisol (p<0.05) and increases in the levels of progesterone and estradiol (p>0.05) when compared with heifers raised in indoor feeding system. The average daily gain was significantly higher (p<0.05) in indoor-raised heifers (0.73 kg/day) as compared to pasture-raised heifers (0.58 kg/day). Also, 25.2% more profits were obtained from the pasture feeding system as compared to the indoor feeding system. These results together would be useful in the investigation of feeding system and growth performance in dairy cattle.

Acknowledgement

Grant : Study on profitability and grazing system of dairy cattle in the Alpine pasture

Supported by : Rural Development Administration

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