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The Effects of Dual-task Action Observation Physical Training on the Walking Ability and Activities of Daily Living in Chronic Stroke Patients

이중과제 동작관찰 신체훈련이 만성 뇌졸중 환자의 보행 능력과 일상생활 활동에 미치는 영향

  • Received : 2016.04.04
  • Accepted : 2016.05.13
  • Published : 2016.05.31

Abstract

PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to determine the efficacy of dual-task action observation training (AOT) and single-task AOT related with daily living task on walking ability and ADL performance in chronic stroke patients. METHODS: Twenty-seven chronic stroke subjects were included in the study. They were randomly assigned to three task categorieds as follows: whole dual-task AOT or partial dual-task AOT or single-task AOT rehabilitation. Whole dual-task AOT observed the movement at once and partial dual-task AOT observed the movement divided into 4 parts related functional gait and activities of daily living task for 2 minutes 30 seconds. Single-task AOT observed the movement related functional gait for 2 minutes 30 seconds. Both groups had physical training session for 12 minutes 30 seconds. The study was conducted for four weeks, with three training sessions a week, for twelve weeks. All subjects were evaluated for their walking ability and activities of daily living through devices, 10m walking test (10MWT), dynamic gait index (DGI), and Korea-Modified Barthel Index (K-MBI). RESULTS: A significant improvement of walking ability and ADL performance happened among dual-task AOT subjects, compared with a single-task AOT subjects, during the 4-weeks course treatment. The results of the study showed statistically significant differences in 10MWT (p<0.05) and DGI (p<0.05), and K-MBI (p<0.05). CONCLUSION: Our results indicated that dual-task AOT has a positive additional impact on recovery of walking ability and ADL performance in chronic stroke patients.

Keywords

Action Observation;Activities of daily living;Dual-task;Gait;Stroke

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