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Agarwood Inhibits Histamine Release from Rat Mast Cells and Reduces Scratching Behavior in Mice -Effect of Agarwood on Histamine Release and Scratching Behavior-

  • Inoue, Eiji (Tokyo Research Center, Kyushin Pharmaceutical Co, Ltd.) ;
  • Shimizu, Yasuharu (Tokyo Research Center, Kyushin Pharmaceutical Co, Ltd.) ;
  • Masui, Ryo (Tokyo Research Center, Kyushin Pharmaceutical Co, Ltd.) ;
  • Tsubonoya, Tomoe (Tokyo Research Center, Kyushin Pharmaceutical Co, Ltd.) ;
  • Hayakawa, Tomomi (Tokyo Research Center, Kyushin Pharmaceutical Co, Ltd.) ;
  • Sudoh, Keiichi (Tokyo Research Center, Kyushin Pharmaceutical Co, Ltd.)
  • Received : 2016.05.06
  • Accepted : 2016.08.01
  • Published : 2016.09.30

Abstract

Objectives: This study was conducted to clarify the effects of agarwood on histamine release from mast cells in rats and on the scratching behaviors in mice. Methods: Histamine release from rat mast cells induced by compound 48/80 or concanavalin A (Con A) and compound 48/80-induced scratching behavior in mice were examined to investigate the effects of agarwood. The hyaluronidase activity and the 3',5'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) levels in mast cells were examined to investigate the mechanisms for the inhibition of histamine release. The correlation between the inhibitory effects of agarwood on histamine release and the content of its typical ingredients, a 2-(2-phenylethyl)chromone derivatives, was analyzed using thin-layer chromatography. Results: Agarwood showed an inhibitory effect on mast-cell histamine release induced by compound 48/80 or Con A without any effect on hyaluronidase activity; this effect involves an increase in the cAMP levels in mast cells. Oral administration of agarwood showed an inhibitory effect on compound 48/80-induced scratching behavior in mice. The inhibitory effects of agarwood on histamine release were quite different, depending on the area where the agarwood was produced, its quality, and its market price. No correlation was found between the inhibitory effects of agarwood on histamine release and the typical ingredients of agarwood, which are 2-(2-phenylethyl)chromone derivatives. Conclusion: These results show that agarwood inhibits histamine release from mast cells partially through an increase in the cAMP levels in cells. We suggest that some active ingredients of agarwood must be effective on oral intake and that agarwood can be used to treat patients with a number of conditions, including urticaria, atopic dermatitis, and bronchial asthma, in which an increase in histamine release occurs. Differences in the pharmacological effects of this crude drug among markets may provide important information for the quality control of this herbal medicine.

Acknowledgement

Supported by : Kyushin Pharmaceutical Co, Ltd.

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