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Effects of wheat supplementation levels on growth performance, blood profiles, nutrient digestibility, and pork quality in growing-finishing pigs

  • Han, Tae Hee (School of Agricultural Biotechnology, Seoul National University) ;
  • Hong, Jin Su (School of Agricultural Biotechnology, Seoul National University) ;
  • Fang, Lin Hu (School of Agricultural Biotechnology, Seoul National University) ;
  • Do, Sung Ho (School of Agricultural Biotechnology, Seoul National University) ;
  • Kim, Byung Ock (School of Agricultural Biotechnology, Seoul National University) ;
  • Kim, Yoo Yong (School of Agricultural Biotechnology, Seoul National University)
  • Received : 2016.10.24
  • Accepted : 2017.01.28
  • Published : 2017.08.01

Abstract

Objective: This study was conducted to evaluate various wheat supplementation levels on growth performance, blood profiles, nutrient digestibility, and pork quality in growing-finishing pigs. Methods: A total of 120 growing pigs ($[Yorkshire{\times}Landrace]{\times}Duroc$), with an average $27.75{\pm}1.319kg$ body weight, were used in growth trial. Pigs were allotted into each treatment by body weight and sex in 4 replicates with 6 pigs per pen in a randomized complete block design. Fourphase feeding programs were used in this experiment. The treatments included the following: i) corn-soybean meal (SBM) - based diet (CON), ii) corn-SBM - based diet+15% of wheat (W15), iii) corn-SBM - based diet+30% of wheat (W30), iv) corn-SBM - based diet+45% of wheat (W45), and 5) corn-SBM-based diet+60% of wheat (W60). Results: There was no significant difference in growth performance among the dietary treatments. However, the gain-to-feed (G:F) ratio tended to increase (quadratic, p<0.08) when the pigs were fed a higher wheat diet during the finishing period. The digestibility of crude ash and fat tended to decrease as the wheat supplementation level increased (p<0.08). The proximate analysis of the longissimus muscle was not affected by the dietary level of wheat. The crude ash content in pork was decreased linearly as the wheat supplementation level increased (p = 0.05). There was no significant difference in the pH level, shear force, water holding capacity, and cooking loss of the pork. In pork and fat, $L^{\star}$, $a^{\star}$, and $b^{\star}$ values were not significantly different among dietary treatments. Conclusion: Wheat can be supplemented up to 60% in a growing-finishing pig without detrimental effects on growth and pork quality. The G:F ratio tended to improve in the finishing period by wheat inclusion.

Keywords

Wheat;Growth Performance;Blood Profile;Nutrient Digestibility;Growing-finishing Pigs

Acknowledgement

Supported by : Korea Institute of Planning and Evaluation for Technology (IPET)

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