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A retrospective study of feline cutaneous tumors in Korea from 2013 to 2018

  • Jung, Ji-Youl (College of Veterinary Medicine and Veterinary Medical Research Institute, Jeju National University) ;
  • Ko, Kyu-Ryeon (College of Veterinary Medicine and Veterinary Medical Research Institute, Jeju National University) ;
  • Choi, Young-Min (College of Veterinary Medicine and Veterinary Medical Research Institute, Jeju National University) ;
  • Jang, Seong-Hwan (College of Veterinary Medicine and Veterinary Medical Research Institute, Jeju National University) ;
  • Kim, Jae-Hoon (College of Veterinary Medicine and Veterinary Medical Research Institute, Jeju National University)
  • Received : 2019.09.02
  • Accepted : 2019.11.05
  • Published : 2019.12.31

Abstract

This study examined the relative incidence of feline cutaneous tumors according to age, breed, sex, and site predilection for these tumors. Biopsy samples were examined and diagnosed from the histopathology. Over a 72-month period, from January 2013 to December 2018, 478 feline biopsy samples were received from veterinary practitioners across the nation. Of these, 232 (48.54%) cases were skin masses. Among them, 73.71% (171/232) were neoplastic lesions and 26.29% (61/232) were non-neoplastic. Twenty-two different types of cutaneous neoplasms were diagnosed as epithelial tumors (15.79%), mesenchymal tumors (83.63%), or melanocytic tumor (0.58%). The four most common tumors were mast cell tumor (60.23%), lipoma (5.85%), basal cell carcinoma (4.68%), and fibrosarcoma (4.68%), which comprised 75.44% of all tumor cases. Cutaneous tumors were located most commonly in the head of the cat (43.27%) and in the Korean shorthaired breed (75.44%). According to this study, cutaneous tumors were the most common tumor types in feline neoplasms in Korea. The incidence of cutaneous tumors was highest in Korean shorthaired cats, the most prevalent breed in Korea. Mast cell tumors are the most common skin neoplasm in Korea and can affect very young cats.

Keywords

Acknowledgement

Supported by : Jeju National University

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