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Numerical Prediction of the Powering Performance of a Car-Ferry in Irregular Waves for Safe Return to Port(SRtP)

불규칙 파랑 중 카페리선의 SRtP 소요마력 수치 추정 연구

  • Park, Il-Ryong (Department of Naval Architecture and Ocean Engineering, Dong-Eui University) ;
  • Kim, Je-in (Marine Hydrodynamic Performance Research Center, Dong-Eui University) ;
  • Suh, Sung-Bu (Department of Naval Architecture and Ocean Engineering, Dong-Eui University) ;
  • Kim, Jin (Korea Ocean Research & Development Institute, Korea research Institute of Ship & Ocean Engineering) ;
  • Kim, Kwang-Soo (Korea Ocean Research & Development Institute, Korea research Institute of Ship & Ocean Engineering) ;
  • Kim, Yoo-Chul (Korea Ocean Research & Development Institute, Korea research Institute of Ship & Ocean Engineering)
  • 박일룡 (동의대학교 조선해양공학과) ;
  • 김제인 (동의대학교 조선해양유체성능평가연구소) ;
  • 서성부 (동의대학교 조선해양공학과) ;
  • 김진 (선박해양플랜트 연구소) ;
  • 김광수 (선박해양플랜트 연구소) ;
  • 김유철 (선박해양플랜트 연구소)
  • Received : 2018.11.30
  • Accepted : 2019.01.14
  • Published : 2019.02.28

Abstract

This paper considers a numerical assessment of the self-propulsion performance of a damaged ferry carrying cars in irregular waves. Computational fluid dynamics(CFD) simulations were performed to see whether the ferry complied with the Safe Return to Port (SRtP) regulations of Lloyd's register, which require that damaged passenger ships should be able to return to port with a speed of 6 knots (3.09 m/s) in Beaufort 8 sea conditions. Two situations were considered for the damaged conditions, i.e., 1) the portside propeller was blocked but the engine room was not flooded and 2) the portside propeller was blocked and one engine room was flooded. The self-propulsion results for the car ferry in intact condition and in the damaged conditions were assessed as follows. First, we validated that the portside propeller was blocked in calm water based on the available experimental results provided by KRISO. The active thrust of starboard propeller with the portside propeller blocked was calculated in Beaufort 8 sea conditions, and the results were compared with the experimental results provided by MARIN, and there was reasonable agreement. The thrust provided by the propeller and the brake horsepower (BHP) with one engine room flooded were compared with the values when the engine room was not flooded. The numerical results were compared with the maximum thrust of the propeller and the maximum brake horse power of the engine to determine whether the damaged car ferry could attain a speed of 6 knots(3.09 m/s).

Keywords

SRtP;CFD;Irregular wave;Self-propulsion;Damaged condition;Flooding condition

Acknowledgement

Supported by : 선박해양플랜트연구소

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