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Characteristics of adhesion areas between the tissue expander and capsule in implant-based breast reconstruction

  • Lim, Yoon Min (Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Institute for Human Tissue Restoration, Yonsei University College of Medicine) ;
  • Park, Kwang Hyun (Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Institute for Human Tissue Restoration, Yonsei University College of Medicine) ;
  • Lee, Dong Won (Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Institute for Human Tissue Restoration, Yonsei University College of Medicine) ;
  • Lew, Dae Hyun (Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Institute for Human Tissue Restoration, Yonsei University College of Medicine) ;
  • Roh, Tai Suk (Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Institute for Human Tissue Restoration, Yonsei University College of Medicine) ;
  • Song, Seung Yong (Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Institute for Human Tissue Restoration, Yonsei University College of Medicine)
  • Received : 2018.04.28
  • Accepted : 2019.05.29
  • Published : 2019.07.15

Abstract

Background The use of anatomic implants has improved the aesthetic results of breast surgery; however, implant malrotation is an uncommon, but serious complication of these procedures. Nevertheless, little research has explored implant adhesion. In this study, we investigated adhesion between the expander and the capsule. Methods Seventy-nine cases of immediate breast reconstruction via two-stage implant-based reconstruction performed between September 2016 and November 2017 were evaluated. Mentor CPX4 expanders were used in 14 breasts, and Natrelle expanders in 65. We analyzed areas of adhesion on the surfaces of the tissue expanders when they were exchanged with permanent implants. We investigated whether adhesions occurred on the cephalic, caudal, anterior, and/or posterior surfaces of the expanders. Results Total adhesion occurred in 18 cases, non-adhesion in 15 cases, and partial adhesion in 46 cases. Of the non-adhesion cases, 80% (n=12) were with Mentor CPX4 expanders, while 94.4% (n=17) of the total adhesion cases were with Natrelle expanders. Of the partial adhesion cases, 90.7% involved the anterior-cephalic surface. The type of tissue expander showed a statistically significant relationship with the number of attachments in both univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses (P<0.001) and with total drainage only in the univariate analysis (P=0.015). Conclusions We sought to identify the location(s) of adhesion after tissue expander insertion. The texture of the implant was a significant predictor of the success of adhesion, and partial adhesion was common. The anterior-cephalic surface showed the highest adhesion rate. Nevertheless, partial adhesion suffices to prevent unwanted rotation of the expander.

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