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Effect of acute heat stress on feed intake and plasma concentrations of tumor necrosis factor-α and free amino acids in growing pigs

  • Kim, Byeonghyeon (Animal Nutrition & Physiology Team, National Institute of Animal Science, Rural Development Administration) ;
  • Kim, Minji (Animal Nutrition & Physiology Team, National Institute of Animal Science, Rural Development Administration) ;
  • Kim, Hye Ran (Animal Nutrition & Physiology Team, National Institute of Animal Science, Rural Development Administration) ;
  • Ji, Sang Yun (Animal Nutrition & Physiology Team, National Institute of Animal Science, Rural Development Administration) ;
  • Kim, Ki Hyun (Animal Welfare Team, National Institute of Animal Science, Rural Development Administration) ;
  • Chun, Ju Lan (Animal Welfare Team, National Institute of Animal Science, Rural Development Administration) ;
  • Baek, Youl-Chang (Animal Nutrition & Physiology Team, National Institute of Animal Science, Rural Development Administration) ;
  • Lee, Yookyung (Animal Nutrition & Physiology Team, National Institute of Animal Science, Rural Development Administration) ;
  • Jeong, Jin Young (Animal Nutrition & Physiology Team, National Institute of Animal Science, Rural Development Administration) ;
  • Lee, Sung Dae (Animal Nutrition & Physiology Team, National Institute of Animal Science, Rural Development Administration)
  • Received : 2020.05.30
  • Accepted : 2020.07.30
  • Published : 2020.09.01

Abstract

Exposure to heat stress (HS) has negative effects on pig production and health. Plasma concentrations of amino acids (AAs) can be used as indicators of HS. Therefore, this study was conducted to evaluate the effect of acute HS on feed intake, water drink, and plasma AAs in pigs. A total of 6 growing pigs (n = 6, 3 boars and 3 gilts) were raised in thermal neutral (TN; 25℃) conditions for the 5-d adaptation period as a control. After the adaptation, pigs were exposed to HS at 33℃ (HS33) for 24 h. All the pigs were fed the same diet formulated to meet or exceed predicted requirements during the whole experimental period. Blood samples were collected after the adaptation and heat treatment to verify the AAs. Measurements were the average daily feed intake (ADFI), average daily water intake (ADWI), water loss, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, nitrate, total nitric oxide, and AAs in the plasma samples. Data were analyzed using the PROC GLM of SAS. HS33 had a lower ADFI (p < 0.05) and a tendency for an increased ADWI and water loss compared to TN. The level of TNF-α was significantly decreased (p < 0.05) in HS33. HS33 had a lower concentration of histidine and sarcosine compared to TN; however, there were no differences in the levels of nitrates and total nitric oxide. In conclusion, the results of this study show the differential effect of HS on the plasma concentration of AAs. We expect that the changed AAs could be potential indicators of HS.

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