• Title, Summary, Keyword: 3D Imaging

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Three-Dimensional Imaging and Display through Integral Photography

  • Navarro, Hector;Dorado, Adrian;Saavedra, Genaro;Corral, Manuel Martinez
    • Journal of information and communication convergence engineering
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    • v.12 no.2
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    • pp.89-96
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    • 2014
  • Here, we present a review of the proposals and advances in the field of three-dimensional (3D) imaging acquisition and display made in the last century. The most popular techniques are based on the concept of stereoscopy. However, stereoscopy does not provide real 3D experience, and produces discomfort due to the conflict between convergence and accommodation. For this reason, we focus this paper on integral imaging, which is a technique that permits the codification of 3D information in an array of 2D images obtained from different perspectives. When this array of elemental images is placed in front of an array of microlenses, the perspectives are integrated producing 3D images with full parallax and free of the convergence-accommodation conflict. In the paper we describe the principles of this technique, together with some new applications of integral imaging.

Comparison Analysis of Donor Liver Volumes Estimated with 3D Magnetic Resonance and 3D Computed Tomography Image Data

  • Kim, Myeong-Seong;Park, Kyeong-Seok;Cho, Jae-Hwan
    • Journal of Magnetics
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    • v.19 no.3
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    • pp.261-265
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    • 2014
  • Three-dimensional computed tomography is an effective tool to estimate the liver volume of living donors for the live liver transplantation. When additional operation is required, magnetic resonance imaging is conducted to determine the safety of the donor. This study compared the accuracy of magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography in estimating 3D liver volume of 23 male and 7 female donors who underwent both magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography tests before the transplantation. The analysis was conducted to see whether the liver's estimated total volumes and the left lobe volumes obtained from 3D-magnetic resonance imaging and 3D-computed tomography were identical. Volumes of the right lobe estimated with 3D-magnetic resonance imaging and 3D-computed tomography were compared with the actual volume of the right lobe harvested in the operating room because the volume of the right lobe is an important determinant in the safety of the donor. The total volume of the liver estimated from 3D-magnetic resonance imaging and 3D-computed tomography differed (1238.1904 units and 1402.364 units respectively). The left lobe volume of the liver estimated with 3D-magnetic resonance imaging and 3D-computed tomography also differed (450.530 units and 554.490 units, respectively). The right lobe volume of the liver estimated with 3D-magnetic resonance imaging and 3D-computed tomography were 787.660 units and 847.545 units, respectively, while the actual average right lobe volume of the harvested liver was 678.636 units. 3D-computed tomography has been widely used to estimate the right lobe volume of the donors' liver. However, 3D-magnetic resonance imaging was also very effective in estimating the volume of the liver. Thus, 3D-magnetic resonance imaging is also expected to become an important tool in determining the safety of the donors before transplantation.

Accuracy and reliability of 2-dimensional photography versus 3-dimensional soft tissue imaging

  • Ayaz, Irem;Shaheen, Eman;Aly, Medhat;Shujaat, Sohaib;Gallo, Giulia;Coucke, Wim;Politis, Constantinus;Jacobs, Reinhilde
    • Imaging Science in Dentistry
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    • v.50 no.1
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    • pp.15-22
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    • 2020
  • Purpose: This study was conducted to objectively and subjectively compare the accuracy and reliability of 2-dimensional(2D) photography and 3-dimensional(3D) soft tissue imaging. Materials and Methods: Facial images of 50 volunteers(25 males, 25 females) were captured with a Nikon D800 2D camera (Nikon Corporation, Tokyo, Japan), 3D stereophotogrammetry (SPG), and laser scanning (LS). All subjects were imaged in a relaxed, closed-mouth position with a normal smile. The 2D images were then exported to Mirror® Software (Canfield Scientific, Inc, NJ, USA) and the 3D images into Proplan CMF® software (version 2.1, Materialise HQ, Leuven, Belgium) for further evaluation. For an objective evaluation, 2 observers identified soft tissue landmarks and performed linear measurements on subjects' faces (direct measurements) and both linear and angular measurements on all images(indirect measurements). For a qualitative analysis, 10 dental observers and an expert in facial imaging (subjective gold standard) completed a questionnaire regarding facial characteristics. The reliability of the quantitative data was evaluated using intraclass correlation coefficients, whereas the Fleiss kappa was calculated for qualitative data. Results: Linear and angular measurements carried out on 2D and 3D images showed excellent inter-observer and intra-observer reliability. The 2D photographs displayed the highest combined total error for linear measurements. SPG performed better than LS, with borderline significance (P=0.052). The qualitative assessment showed no significant differences among the 2D and 3D imaging modalities. Conclusion: SPG was found to a reliable and accurate tool for the morphological evaluation of soft tissue in comparison to 2D imaging and laser scanning.

3D Image Display Method using Synthetic Aperture integral imaging (Synthetic aperture 집적 영상을 이용한 3D 영상 디스플레이 방법)

  • Shin, Dong-Hak;Yoo, Hoon
    • Journal of the Korea Institute of Information and Communication Engineering
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    • v.16 no.9
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    • pp.2037-2042
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    • 2012
  • Synthetic aperture integral imaging is one of promising 3D imaging techniques to capture the high-resolution elemental images using multiple cameras. In this paper, we propose a method of displaying 3D images in space using the synthetic aperture integral imaging technique. Since the elemental images captured from SAII cannot be directly used to display 3D images in an integral imaging display system, we first extract the depth map from elemental images and then transform them to novel elemental images for 3D image display. The newly generated elemental images are displayed on a display panel to generate 3D images in space. To show the usefulness of the proposed method, we carry out the preliminary experiments using a 3D toy object and present the experimental results.

A Novel 3-D Imaging Configuration Exploiting Synthetic Aperture Ladar

  • Guo, Liang;Huang, Yinli;Li, Xiaozhen;Zeng, Xiaodong;Tang, Yu;Xing, Mengdao
    • Current Optics and Photonics
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    • v.1 no.6
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    • pp.598-603
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    • 2017
  • Traditional three-dimensional (3-D) laser imaging systems are based on real aperture imaging technology, whose resolution decreases as the range increases. In this paper, we develop a novel 3-D imaging technique based on the synthetic aperture technology in which the imaging resolution is significantly improved and does not degrade with the increase of the range. We consider an imaging laser radar (ladar) system using the floodlight transmitting mode and multi-beam receiving mode. High 3-D imaging resolutions are achieved by matched filtering the linear frequency modulated (LFM) signals respectively in range, synthetic aperture along-track, and the real aperture across-track. In this paper, a novel 3-D imaging signal model is given first. Because of the motion during the transmission of a sweep, the Doppler shift induced by the continuous motion is taken into account. And then, a proper algorithm for the 3-D imaging geometry is given. Finally, simulation results validate the effectiveness of the proposed technique.

High-speed Three-dimensional Surface Profile Measurement with the HiLo Optical Imaging Technique

  • Kang, Sewon;Ryu, Inkeon;Kim, Daekeun;Kauh, Sang Ken
    • Current Optics and Photonics
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    • v.2 no.6
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    • pp.568-575
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    • 2018
  • Various techniques to measure the three-dimensional (3D) surface profile of a 3D micro- or nanostructure have been proposed. However, it is difficult to apply such techniques directly to industrial uses because most of them are relatively slow, unreliable, and expensive. The HiLo optical imaging technique, which was recently introduced in the field of fluorescence imaging, is a promising wide-field imaging technique capable of high-speed imaging with a simple optical configuration. It has not been used in measuring a 3D surface profile although confocal microscopy originally developed for fluorescence imaging has been adapted to the field of 3D optical measurement for a long time. In this paper, to the best of our knowledge, the HiLo optical imaging technique for measuring a 3D surface profile is proposed for the first time. Its optical configuration and algorithm for a precisely detecting surface position are designed, optimized, and implemented. Optical performance for several 3D microscale structures is evaluated, and it is confirmed that the capability of measuring a 3D surface profile with HiLo optical imaging technique is comparable to that with confocal microscopy.

Interactive 3D Integral Imaging System using Single Camera (하나의 카메라를 이용한 인터렉티스 3D 집적 영상 시스템)

  • Shin, Dong-Hak;Kim, Eun-Soo
    • The Journal of Korean Institute of Communications and Information Sciences
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    • v.33 no.10C
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    • pp.829-835
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    • 2008
  • Recently, 3D integral imaging system, which is well known as an auto-stereoscopic 3D display method, has been gaining great attention amongst researchers. The integral imaging is a promising 3D display technology since it is able to deliver continuous viewing points, full parallax, and full color view to the observers in space. In this paper, we propose a novel interactive 3D integral imaging system using a single camera. The user interface is implemented by adding a camera in the conventional integral imaging system. To show the possibility of the proposed system, we implement the optical setup and present the preliminary results. To our best knowledge, this is the first time to study an interactive 3D integral imaging.

Comparisons of Object Recognition Performance with 3D Photon Counting & Gray Scale Images

  • Lee, Chung-Ghiu;Moon, In-Kyu
    • Journal of the Optical Society of Korea
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    • v.14 no.4
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    • pp.388-394
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    • 2010
  • In this paper the object recognition performance of a photon counting integral imaging system is quantitatively compared with that of a conventional gray scale imaging system. For 3D imaging of objects with a small number of photons, the elemental image set of a 3D scene is obtained using the integral imaging set up. We assume that the elemental image detection follows a Poisson distribution. Computational geometrical ray back propagation algorithm and parametric maximum likelihood estimator are applied to the photon counting elemental image set in order to reconstruct the original 3D scene. To evaluate the photon counting object recognition performance, the normalized correlation peaks between the reconstructed 3D scenes are calculated for the varied and fixed total number of photons in the reconstructed sectional image changing the total number of image channels in the integral imaging system. It is quantitatively illustrated that the recognition performance of the photon counting integral imaging system can be similar to that of a conventional gray scale imaging system as the number of image viewing channels in the photon counting integral imaging (PCII) system is increased up to the threshold point. Also, we present experiments to find the threshold point on the total number of image channels in the PCII system which can guarantee a comparable recognition performance with a gray scale imaging system. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on comparisons of object recognition performance with 3D photon counting & gray scale images.

INDUSTRIAL MATHEMATICS IN ULTRASOUND IMAGING

  • JANG, JAESEONG;AHN, CHI YOUNG
    • Journal of the Korean Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics
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    • v.20 no.3
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    • pp.175-202
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    • 2016
  • Ultrasound imaging is a widely used tool for visualizing human body's internal organs and quantifying clinical parameters. Due to its advantages such as safety, non-invasiveness, portability, low cost and real-time 2D/3D imaging, diagnostic ultrasound industry has steadily grown. Since the technology advancements such as digital beam-forming, Doppler ultrasound, real-time 3D imaging and automated diagnosis techniques, there are still a lot of demands for image quality improvement, faster and accurate imaging, 3D color Doppler imaging and advanced functional imaging modes. In order to satisfy those demands, mathematics should be used properly and effectively in ultrasound imaging. Mathematics has been used commonly as mathematical modelling, numerical solutions and visualization, combined with science and engineering. In this article, we describe a brief history of ultrasound imaging, its basic principle, its applications in obstetrics/gynecology, cardiology and radiology, domestic-industrial products, contributions of mathematics and challenging issues in ultrasound imaging.